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Thread: The N/A Upgrade FAQ

  1. #1
    Supramania Regular

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    Default The N/A Upgrade FAQ

    It's been awhile since the old N/A Upgrade FAQ was written, and I think it's time to write a new updated one that's more accurate, now that we've found a little more information. I'll list the modifications and stuff in "stages", 1 being the first thing you should do, and the highest number being the things you should do later. Here's a table of contents...

    Post 1 - Stage 1: Maintenance [MA70S1]
    Post 2 - Stage 2: Basic Modifications [MA70S2], Stage 3: Semi-Basic Modifications [MA70S3]
    Post 3 - Stage 4: Advanced Modifications [MA70S4]
    Post 4 - Misc. Modifications/Modifications Being Tested [MA70MM]

    Press CTRL+F then type in what is inside the brackets, then press "Enter" twice so you can quickly go to the desired section.

    Stage 1: Maintenance
    [MA70S1]

    I've made a completely different topic about this. Look at The N/A Maintenance FAQ. You should always do maintenance before performance modifications.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: The Updated N/A Upgrade FAQ

    Stage 2: Basic Modifications
    [MA70S2]

    Before you enter this stage, consider what you want. Do you REALLY want to stay N/A? If you want a LOT of power, then you can't expect an N/A to do that for you. Turbo is obviously the way to go, and if you want to go turbo, there is another sticky that's in this section that can help with that.

    Intake- The stock intake in itself is a good flowing cold air intake, and the helmholtz resonator (intake resonator) is actually good for performance and should not be removed. The only thing that should be removed is the accordian section, and it should be replaced by something such as an aluminum pipe. This will get your engine breathing better due to smooth flow. Also if you decide to change out the stock filter, go for an AEM DryFlo as those are currently the best filters on the market because they offer good flow AND filtering.

    Exhaust- One of the most restrictive parts of the Supra is the Exhaust System. By replacing the stock exhaust, you'll have a noticeable difference in power. The stock exhaust is basically a crush bent 2 inch inner diameter exhaust system with a restrictive catalytic converter, and a restrictive muffler. Basically, get better flowing mufflers and larger diameter tubing. Decide what's best for you by listening to general consensus. The general consensus is to go 2.5 inch, but if you want to go turbo, you can go 3 inch as well without suffering too many negative effects other than noise (but that can be stopped if you get HUGE mufflers/resonators)

    Header- Technically, this is part of the exhaust, but people consider it a seperate part since the above is a "catback". This mod is supposed to free up the exhaust more, but keep in mind these aftermarket headers will not immediately fit on your Supra unless you get someone to weld and fit it on. Changing this will make your car louder, and from what I recall, it will make your engine bay much hotter unless you somehow keep the heat in, whether you're using header wrap or ceramic coating them. The stock design is pretty good (although it does need improvements. Along with the fact that it is cast iron and heavy), so this mod is only recommended if you're going for that extra push.

    Stage 3: Semi-Basic Modifications
    [MA70S3]

    Well, the most cost effective way to go is Intake/Headers/Exhaust. What do you do after that? You can do a number of things.

    Lightweight Driveshaft- a lightweight driveshaft will reduce the rotational mass, which will in turn, make it much easier to accelerate. There have been dynos that say horsepower is gained, for example, Piratetip's car had an increase in power. The power is gained not due to extra power, but due to power being "freed up" due to the lighter rotational mass. Most lightweight 1 piece driveshafts are 10-14 lbs, and the stock driveshaft is around 32-34 lbs. The loss of rotational mass is HUGE! Keep in mind if the driveshaft is not properly balanced, there will be some vibrations at speeds of around 70 MPH. Lately, there have been developments in lightweight 2 piece driveshafts for those who are worried about driveshaft critical speed.

    Lightweight Flywheel- This concept applies only to manual cars and is similar to the concept above. Reduction of rotational mass to free up power.

    Lightweight Wheels- Well, most wheels are lighter than the sawblades. Sawblades without tires on them weigh around 24 lbs, so it shouldn't be hard to find stuff that's lighter than them. The concept of this is similar to the above, reduction of rotational mass.

    Advanced Timing- Some advance their timing to 12-14 BTDC to gain extra throttle response/power, but keep in mind the "power gain" is minimal (if not even existant). If you do this, you will need to run high(er) octane than 87, or you run the risk of detonation.

    Lightweight Parts/Removal of Parts- Well the only thing left to do is replace the heavier parts of the car's body with lightweight parts, or remove the heavier stuff. Some stuff that people remove are the backseats, air conditioner system, and/or power steering. They also remove the spare tire and jack. Some people replace the hood, since the stock hood is very heavy. Common replacement materials for the hood are carbon fiber and fiberglass. Keep in mind removal of parts towards the rear will hurt your traction, but a decent way to solve this problem is to relocate the battery to the rear.

    Fuel Controller- Supras stock tend to run rich, so you can take advantage by tuning the Air/Fuel Ratio to gain a few horsepower. The ideal Air/Fuel Ratio (AFR) at Wide Open Throttle (WOT) is 12.5:1.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: The Updated N/A Upgrade FAQ

    Stage 4: Advanced Modifications
    [MA70S4]

    At this point, you may want to stop unless you're aiming for the fastest N/A or something. I'm not going to go in-depth into this, since if you're going for this, you probably already know what you're doing. The advanced modifications consist of:

    Individual Throttle Bodies
    Upgraded Camshafts
    High Compression Pistons
    Increase Stroke/Bore
    Port/Polish
    Shimming Accumulators (Automatic Cars Only)

    Here's a nice informative link on how to modify your A340E by shimming accumulators. Yeah, it's SupraForums, but the thread is good.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: The N/A Upgrade FAQ

    Misc. Modifications/Modifications Being Tested
    [MA70MM]

    These are upgrades that are not usually done, but I'll post about them anyway.

    Ignition Upgrade- Some people like to upgrade the ignition system. Bishop, a person who has done this to his old N/A, noticed that no power was gained. 935motorsports did this to his N/A, and noticed that the response increased. You can do this if you really want.

    Throttlebody Upgrade- I've seen this done before, but I have no idea what gains it gives. It might be useful to modify this since our stock TBs are restrictive, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tire Shredder View Post
    it should be noted that when you increase the size of hte throttle body, the ECU thinks that you still have the same size TB (since you're using the stock TPS) and it assumes you're applying a given amount of load and air flow to the engine. I had a conversation with ED_Jza80 who built 7MA61's 7mge mk2 (has twin plate 57mm cobra throttle body on it) and he said he would get massive amounts of detonation at around 4000rpm at part throttle, sometimes at full throttle with the stock ecu. He suggested to not change the throttle body unless you have a standalone or sufficient means of adjusting for it.
    Not sure if this holds true for all cars or is just a small minority.

    7MGTE Camshafts- This mod is currently being discussed. It is theorized that it will give the N/A better high-end power in trading for low-end power.

    Increasing your Compression with a different Headgasket- This is considered to be a bad idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by drjonez
    shaving the head to up CR isn't the best idea as the combustion chamber gets all wacky then
    Quote Originally Posted by IJ.
    It affects the "Squish band" and the Quench of the head and changes how it burns the fuel.
    AFM Mod - The AFM mod, in which you loosen the spring is said to be a useful mod. The theory behind it is that the AFM is restrictive due to the flapper door being hard to open. I tried this mod once, and noticed nothing but worse gas mileage due to running richer. I'm pretty sure the only thing this mod does is mess with your fuel map.

    Running a GM Mass Air Flow Sensor (MAF) over the AFM, and using MAF-T Pro - Here are some links/info to that:
    MAFT Pro Install
    MAFT Pro Discussion

    ECU Reflash/Reprogramming- You can't do this with an MKIII Supra. Don't fall into the Jet Chip Trap. To modify fuel maps and such, you need a a standalone or a piggyback.

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