Powered by Team Mondor
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Conventional Oil Filters

  1. #11
    Official SM Expert: Motor Oil, Lubricants & Filtration
    jdub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    10,731

    Default Re: Conventional Oil Filters

    Nick - From what I understand, the old Denso filters were pretty good...I've never had one though and did not have the opportunity to cut one open. All the ones I've seen in the US as of late are made in Thailand.
    I will no longer respond to tech questions via PM. If you have a question, put it on the forum so everyone benefits from the answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Supracentral
    However I still stand by my statement that 99 times out of 100, the weak link in the MKIII is the owner.
    Quote Originally Posted by jetjock
    I swear, it's like talking to an amoeba...


    Want to know about oil...read this:
    Motor Oil 101 - Dr AE Haas


    "Life is like a jar of Jalapeno Peppers
    What you do today, might Burn Your Ass Tomorrow"

  2. #12
    Supramania Regular
    OneJArpus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Newark, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    2,806

    Default Re: Conventional Oil Filters

    I'm going to try all Amsoil products


    EAO57 PT #for oil filter ($15.99)

    Good for 25K or 1 YR I'll be changing it more frequently

    1988 TOYOTA SUPRA 93,XXX on chassis & counting...........................................................
    1.5JZ, HKS 264 Cams and much more
    12.016 @ 115 tuned 20 psi 2015 - Fastest time to date - Hoosier Drag Radials 1.6 60 ft
    480 rwhp 423 lb ft of tq



  3. #13
    Official SM Expert: Motor Oil, Lubricants & Filtration
    jdub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    10,731

    Default Re: Conventional Oil Filters

    EAo filters are excellent...my only problem with Amsoil is their pricing and marketing technique to keep that pricing at the level it is. If you plan on using Amsoil oil, my recommendation would be their Signature Series 0W-30 (SSO).
    I will no longer respond to tech questions via PM. If you have a question, put it on the forum so everyone benefits from the answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Supracentral
    However I still stand by my statement that 99 times out of 100, the weak link in the MKIII is the owner.
    Quote Originally Posted by jetjock
    I swear, it's like talking to an amoeba...


    Want to know about oil...read this:
    Motor Oil 101 - Dr AE Haas


    "Life is like a jar of Jalapeno Peppers
    What you do today, might Burn Your Ass Tomorrow"

  4. #14
    Lurker of Power
    Asterix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Vienna, VA
    Posts
    418

    Default Re: See Purolator PureOne new Purty filter

    Another filter dissection site that I've not seen here yet:

    http://www.knizefamily.net/minimopar...reference.html

    http://www.knizefamily.net/minimopar/oilfilters/

    Asterix

  5. #15
    Official SM Expert: Motor Oil, Lubricants & Filtration
    jdub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    10,731

    Default Re: Conventional Oil Filters

    A very good description on filter efficiency and what filter Beta (β) means.

    Quote Originally Posted by Filter Manufacturers Council
    Revised October 2005

    Technical Service Bulletin 89-5R3
    The Micron Rating for Media in Fluid Filters

    A micron rating for a fluid filter is a generalized way of indicating the ability of the filter's media to remove contaminants by the size of particles it is exposed to. The micron rating does not properly or fully describe either the efficiency or the contaminant-holding capacity of the filter media. ENGINE AIR FILTER MEDIA IS NOT RATED BY MICRON SIZE. (Refer to TSB 04-3, Air Filter Life and Efficiency Ratings)

    What does the word micron mean? The word micron is another term for micrometer (1 millionth of a meter). A micrometer is a unit of linear measure in the metric system used to measure distance from one point to another. It is used like the inch, foot, centimeter and millimeter to measure length, width or diameter of objects. Its scientific notation is μ. Some linear equivalents are 1 inch is 25,400 microns and 1 micron is .000039 inches. Some comparative sizes are:

    Diameter of average human hair 70 microns
    Lower limit of visibility (naked eye) 40 microns
    White blood cells 25 microns
    Talcum powder 10 microns
    Red blood cells 8 microns
    Bacteria 2 microns
    Carbon black 0.6 microns
    Tobacco smoke 0.5 microns

    A filter that is marked or rated "10 micron" has some capability to capture particles as small as 10 micrometers. However, when you see a filter marked "10 micron", you do not know exactly what this means unless you also have a description of the test methods and standards used to determine the filter rating. The results from the different test methods may not be comparable as their methodology varies greatly.

    The two most popular reported media ratings are a nominal micron rating (50&#37 and an absolute micron rating (98.7%). A nominal rating usually means the filter's media can capture a given percentage of particles of a stated size. For example, a filter might be said to have a nominal rating of 50% for particles 10 micrometers in size or larger. An absolute micron rating can be determined by single-pass or multi-pass testing and is usually obtained by passing a test fluid containing particles of a known size through a small, flat sheet of filter media. Any particles that pass through the media are captured and measured. An absolute rating is also expressed in the form of a percentage of the size of particles captured.

    Until recently, there has not been one universally accepted test method to measure or describe the media pore size or the size of particles a filter media can capture and hold. Depending on which test method was used, the same filter media could be rated with different micron ratings, thus leading to confusion regarding how well the filter's media actually performs. Fortunately, there now exists a test procedure called multi-pass testing or Beta ratio testing (β) which is, a universally accepted test method that yields readily comparable test results. Multi-pass testing has been recognized by SAE (SAE J1858), ISO (ISO 4548-12, lube oil and ISO16889, hydraulic or fuel), ANSI (American National Standards Institute) and NFPA (National Fluid Power Association).

    Multi-pass testing uses a specified contaminant, of known sizes, added regularly in measured quantities to the fluid which is pumped continuously through the filter. Measured samples of fluid are then taken at timed intervals from the upstream and downstream sides of the filter. The contaminant in the samples is measured for particle sizes and quantities of each size or range of sizes. From these upstream and downstream measurements, a Beta ratio is formulated by dividing the number of particles of a particular size in the upstream flow by the number of particles of the same size in the downstream flow. For example:

    βx = # of Particles Upstream/# Particles Downstream

    β10 = 1000/500 -or- β10 = 2

    β stands for Beta
    X represents the size of particle checked
    X(c) per ISO 16889

    In this example, the equation provides the following information: regarding 10- micrometer or micron size particles, the filter media tested has a Beta ratio of 2. This information is helpful but not useful without knowing what the ratio actually means. To translate the Beta ratio into meaningful information, subtract 1 from the original ratio and divide that answer by the original ratio. This answer represents the efficiency of the media at the specified particle size. For this example, take the Beta ratio of 2, subtract 1 from it and divide that answer by the original ratio of 2 or 2 - 1 = 1 ÷ 2 = 50% efficient at removing 10-micrometer or micron size particles. This formula is used to translate any Beta ratio into a percent efficiency at removing the size of particle tested. Here are a few Beta ratios and their corresponding efficiencies:

    Beta Ratio ---- Efficiency
    2........................50%
    10......................90%
    20......................95%
    75......................98.7%
    100....................99%
    200....................99.5%
    1000..................99.9%

    Beta ratio information can also be stated as β 5/10/20 = 2/20/75. In this example, the media tested removed 50% of 5-micrometer or micron size particles, 95% of 10-micrometer or micron size particles and 98.7% of 20-micrometer or micron size particles presented to it. This same ratio information can also be stated as β 2/20/75 = 5/10/20. Both equations state the same information in two different ways and are both accepted by the industry.

    Multi-pass testing provides an accurate, universally accepted, comparable test method to describe the efficiency of a media's ability to remove certain size contaminants. It can also determine the total contaminant holding capacity of the filter as well as some of its differential pressure capabilities. Its use eliminates the inaccuracies and confusion caused by the use of "micron ratings". For further information, see TSB 97-1R1, Hydraulic Filter Performance Criteria and TSB 04-2R1, ISO Updates to Multi-pass Liquid Filter Test Procedures.

    For additional information, contact:
    Filter Manufacturers Council
    P.O. Box 13966
    Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-3966
    Phone: 919/406-8817 Fax: 919/406-1306
    www.filtercouncil.org
    Administered by Motor & Equipment Manufacturers Association
    I will no longer respond to tech questions via PM. If you have a question, put it on the forum so everyone benefits from the answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Supracentral
    However I still stand by my statement that 99 times out of 100, the weak link in the MKIII is the owner.
    Quote Originally Posted by jetjock
    I swear, it's like talking to an amoeba...


    Want to know about oil...read this:
    Motor Oil 101 - Dr AE Haas


    "Life is like a jar of Jalapeno Peppers
    What you do today, might Burn Your Ass Tomorrow"

  6. #16
    Official SM Expert: Motor Oil, Lubricants & Filtration
    jdub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    10,731

    Default Re: Conventional Oil Filters

    Here's a link to another forum with pics of dissected oil filter showing their construction...seems there's another lunatic running around that cuts open filters

    Oil Filters - Dissected
    I will no longer respond to tech questions via PM. If you have a question, put it on the forum so everyone benefits from the answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Supracentral
    However I still stand by my statement that 99 times out of 100, the weak link in the MKIII is the owner.
    Quote Originally Posted by jetjock
    I swear, it's like talking to an amoeba...


    Want to know about oil...read this:
    Motor Oil 101 - Dr AE Haas


    "Life is like a jar of Jalapeno Peppers
    What you do today, might Burn Your Ass Tomorrow"

  7. #17
    Supramania Regular

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Twin Cities, Minnesot-ah
    Posts
    5,190

    Default Re: Conventional Oil Filters

    Hey Jon,

    I have to ask. I have not seen any numbers on the Canton Media. Found any?
    Purveyor of the "Gold" carburetor !!!

    Curb stomping misinformation since 1994!

    Want Free high end technical assitance?! Click Here!

    More than you ever wanted to know about wiring!

  8. #18
    Official SM Expert: Motor Oil, Lubricants & Filtration
    jdub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    10,731

    Default Re: Conventional Oil Filters

    Nothing independent. Oil analysis for guys using that filter (other cars) have been very good particulate wise.
    I will no longer respond to tech questions via PM. If you have a question, put it on the forum so everyone benefits from the answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Supracentral
    However I still stand by my statement that 99 times out of 100, the weak link in the MKIII is the owner.
    Quote Originally Posted by jetjock
    I swear, it's like talking to an amoeba...


    Want to know about oil...read this:
    Motor Oil 101 - Dr AE Haas


    "Life is like a jar of Jalapeno Peppers
    What you do today, might Burn Your Ass Tomorrow"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •