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Thread: The Fruition of Obsession -- 310,000 mile makeover --

  1. #51
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    Default Re: The Fruition of Obsession -- 310,000 mile makeover --

    dear lort i need do to the same with my harness... can't wait to see how urs turns out!!
    My Restoration/build thread

    Garage Clean Out!! Fund raising for the rebuild!!!


    1988 Ice Blue Metallic 7M-GTE... never-ending project

  2. #52
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    Default Re: The Fruition of Obsession -- 310,000 mile makeover --

    Just dropped $200 on techflex sleeving and heatshrink.

    Carbon Fiber for the main harness parts, Insultherm fiberglass sleeving for the spot that goes over the cams or other high heat areas, Flexo PET for most everything else.

    I've already ordered all connectors I could from Toyota, now just need to order wire, terminals, seals, crimpers and.... i think that's it.

    Total will probably be in the neighborhood of $900-$1100 and totally worth it.

  3. #53

    Default Re: The Fruition of Obsession -- 310,000 mile makeover --

    Only issue I have with the flex sheathing is that if for any reason you need to open the harness you would have to slice it open. Not to mention running a new wire in there would be a total pita and its impossible to replace the sheathing without depinning all the connectors.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyFi6 View Post
    Only issue I have with the flex sheathing is that if for any reason you need to open the harness you would have to slice it open. Not to mention running a new wire in there would be a total pita and its impossible to replace the sheathing without depinning all the connectors.
    Yup. Agreed. I'm debating running extra dummy wires for maft pro/speed density just in case. Depinning and redoing a section of harness won't be too bad. The larger core section might expand over connectors anyways.

    I debated using the flex wrap stuff, but its nowhere near as clean looking.

    Sent from my ADR6400L using Tapatalk

  5. #55
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    Default Re: The Fruition of Obsession -- 310,000 mile makeover --

    Ordered a Paladin crimper with open barrel terminal crimper for ~$70. I debated a pro-crimper from tyco or some other high $$ crimper, but the project cost is mounting quickly and this should do the job plenty well.


    Also ordered $300 in MIL spec 22759/16 wire, about 900 feet or so. I got most solid colors and will use heatshrink to indicate stripes. Now all that remains is terminals (I still have to count out how many of each type i will need) and a few oddball connectors that aren't available from Toyota.

    Also just found out one of my tires is trashed. I got them second hand and they needed replacement anyways. Looks like I'll be ordering some new tires this spring. I'm thinking BF Goodrich G-force or maybe Continental Extreme Contact. I LOVE the tread design on the G-force tire and it gets great reviews so I'm leaning towards that.

  6. #56
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    Default Re: The Fruition of Obsession -- 310,000 mile makeover --

    I hope you find the time to write up your instrument mods. By the way, for making little custom PCB boards, just go to this guy

    http://dorkbotpdx.org/wiki/pcb_order

    Use whatever CAD you like to generate the gerber files, then have them professionally made for $5 per square inch for three copies of your two layer design. Most of your boards looked like they were 1-2 sq inches, so this is really cheap.

  7. #57
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    Default Re: The Fruition of Obsession -- 310,000 mile makeover --

    Quote Originally Posted by 3p141592654 View Post
    I hope you find the time to write up your instrument mods. By the way, for making little custom PCB boards, just go to this guy

    http://dorkbotpdx.org/wiki/pcb_order

    Use whatever CAD you like to generate the gerber files, then have them professionally made for $5 per square inch for three copies of your two layer design. Most of your boards looked like they were 1-2 sq inches, so this is really cheap.
    Yeah, I should get my lazy ass typing one of these days. My biggest hesitation has been uploading all the photos to photobucket. I had the camera unintentionally set to the highest quality so each pic is like 3MB and I have dozen of pics... So it'll take a while to upload everything, lol. And photobucket seems to timeout if I do more than 5-10 at a time when they're that large a file.

    **Edit, oh and that guys proto board offering is super cheap. I wonder what thickness the board are though? And what the minimum size board would be. He lists a lot of specs on the actual trace and annular rings, but i dont see actual min. board dimensions. Good find and thanks for the tip!!!

    I'm hoping to post solid documentation on all the wiring harness stuff too. This has been quite a scavenger hunt so far and I think it would be a good asset to the community to have all the info in a central place. It's funny how much info is needed to replicate a wire harness. I honestly didn't know what I was getting into and I'm surprised how much goes into planning this all out.

    I just spent a few hours in the garage messing with the harness. I made a terminal tool according to Toyota's specs and pulled out some terminals, photographed them, found another handful of wires that are broken or that I broke while handling the harness just now. That harness was just a time-bomb waiting to leave me stranded. It will be a huge relief to get this thing replaced. My 02 sensor connector disintegrated. It no longer has locking tabs to hold the connectors in place and it's not available through Toyota... Argh. So now I have to find a different vendor that has it or change the connector entirely so something else that hopefully uses the same terminal type at least.

    Oh, the joys of a massive wiring project...
    Last edited by suprarx7nut; December 31st, 2011 at 07:04 PM.

  8. #58
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    Default Re: The Fruition of Obsession -- 310,000 mile makeover --

    LED Needles writeup

    Well here it goes. This took a ton of labor to perfect. I'm no wiring genius and until this my circuit prototyping experience was practically zero. I'd worked on basic breadboard projects in my electronics 101 engineering course, but that was about it.

    First, for a perspective, these are the SMT LED I'm dealing with.


    They are far from the smallest available, but are plenty small for this project. They are a 1206 package. Digikey part number 160-1167-1-ND. I got 50 of them for under $5 a year ago thinking they might come in handy at some point.

    This is my power source. 8 1.5 AA batteries in series. That makes 12V for those scoring at home.


    And just for shits, a picture of my garage. Nothing special, but I love it. It's a rental, but if I owned it you'd see finished walls, epoxy floor and wall storage galore. But alas, I'm still young so home ownership isn't under my belt yet and my garages are pretty basic.


    So the gauge lighting concerns starts with the fact that once you update the face lighting with LED's, the needles fail to glow as brightly, especially if you pain the needles. I wanted a crisp white face and deep red needle. This means White leds in the face and red SMT (surface mount technology) LED's or SMD (surface mount diode). Mine were roughly 1mm tall which means they can fit between the gauge face and the component behind the gauge. The amount of clearance available varies from gauge to gauge. The speedometer and oil pressure gauge likely have the least amount of clearance. They were the most difficult for me. The easiest is probably the tach.

    So onto design. I started with a search for a substrate. Having no experience with circuits I was lost. All i knew was I needed something very thin and something that I could stick some LED's to. To try my plan I and to make sure the LED's would light the needle correctly, I started with cardboard and an old credit card. LED's worked and lit the needle perfectly. The cardboard and/or credit card as a substrate was a horrible idea, but you probably could have guessed that.



    Somehow I lost a ton of photos which would have shown exactly how I made each circuit board. At some point I'll add them back in if I find them. For now, I'll have to skip some pictures and bore you with words.

    Before actually doing anymore building I measured the hell out of the gauges and the mounting areas. I measured everything in inches and to an accuracy of 0.01". I wasn't able to hold that same accuracy during the build part, but the accurate measurements were definitely helpful. The only gauges that were similar were the water temp and gas gauge; and even those had minor differences if i recall correctly. Once I had all my measurements I modeled the baords I had in mind in SolidWorks (CAD).






    The above drawings should be right, but I had to make adjustments and I'm not positive I went back to edit all the cad files. So use that info at your own risk, lol.

    Once I had everything modeled it was time to start building. A pair of locking foreceps was key to soldering with the SMD's. My soldering iron is a basic POS and made this more difficult that it could have been with a good iron. I found some proto board about 2 inches square and 2mm thick. I used a dremel to cut the boards into the correct size and then proceeded to start the wiring. The pieces all needed to be pretty thin. The speedo especially has very little clearance and has a very delicate piece of the gauge directly underneath where the LEDs are mounted. This means you have to be very sure your LED inserts will not touch the instrument. The needles on all gauges are very delicate. Any slight rubbing means the gauge is worthless and you have very little margin for error.

    I had a great picture of the speedo showing exactly how tight it is, but I seem to have lost it. Imagine a very small space....

    The smaller gauges all have a light guide system that relies on the face lighting to carry into the center of the gauge face, where a semicircular extrusion of clear plastic grabs the light and throws it out onto the needle. Clever design, but unfortunately it wont work with what we're doing and you need to cut it off. I used a dremel and was very, very careful.


    Below you can see the difference between pre 89 (my prototype dash) and 89+ (My actual car). The pre 89's have a TON of space for the needle to catch light from below. The 89+ on the left have just a small square (green arrow) to catch light for the needle. This affects how much light is needed and determines whether or not you need to drill out the gauge plastic to let more light through. My proto board (pre89) was fine leaving the plastic backing alone, but on my actual car (89+) I had to drill out the plastic entirely underneath the needle.




    This is what I'm talking about:

    Left alone:


    Drilled out:


    In the picture above you can see how the LED's are mounted. It's pretty basic, really. You just need to measure everything and know where you need to center the LED's.

    Here's the Speedo finished:



    And here's what the board looked like more or less when I was done with the speedo. I had to use my dremel drill press as a mill and mill a channel for the wire. The clearance was so low that the board plus the wire (22AWG) was too thick. The problem with the speedo is that you cant have anything hanging down under the board, so the wires cant be underneath, they have to be on top.



    This is the speedo unit. That coil is the gauge and is incredibly sensitive. Nothing can touch it.



    Just for shits, here is the oil pressure gauge. I dont understand how the gauge actually moves, but the whole thing is so flimsy I just cant grasp how it could be very accurate.



    Here is one of the small gauges after already having shaved the bottom of the needle base. Clearance are very, very tight. You want to keep this clearance minimal so you have less light escaping from the center of the gauge. Light bleed will be noticable when you use two different colors for the needles vs gauges.




    Continued in another post since I think i'm getting close to the one post pic limit. This will all end up in the lighting thread as well.
    Last edited by suprarx7nut; January 1st, 2012 at 03:09 AM.

  9. #59
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    Default Re: The Fruition of Obsession -- 310,000 mile makeover --

    nice progress, you should try doing the printable circuit board with laser printers it worked really well for Albert and I when we were doing our needle lights. The supplies are cheap and make life easier for sokdering in the smd leds. Also if u get to much splash on the top of the face put a little brass ring in the bass of the needle, it can be made from brass tubing from an ACE hardware or craft store. Cant wait for the other pics your going to post up.

    My shaved engine bay and 2j swap <-------- Click Here -------> Come for a Ride

  10. #60
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    Default Re: The Fruition of Obsession -- 310,000 mile makeover --

    Well the wiring harness is still under way. Tracking down brand new terminal pins is a BITCH. Very difficult to source.

    Anyways, while waiting to find all the terminals, I made a little bracket/brace for some switches I got. Doesn't look pretty now, but after a matte black paint job it should blend it pretty well. The first switch will be for a diagnostics jumper. Checking codes you say? Simply flip the switch and turn the key.





    Before I start the harness assembly I'll take a picture of all the parts laid out. Should be a BIG picture, lol.

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