Venezuela enters the final stages of socialist cancer

Supracentral

Supramania Contributor
Authorized Seller
Contributor
Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Messages
10,541
Likes
5
#1
Way back in 2009, I predicted this:

http://www.supramania.com/forums/sh...-to-death...&p=1263120&viewfull=1#post1263120

18 months later, was this:

http://www.supramania.com/forums/sh......&p=1614099&highlight=venezuela#post1614099

Now, 5 years later, it all starts coming home to roost:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...rs-ordered-to-hand-over-produce-to-state.html

Venezuelan farmers ordered to hand over produce to state
As Venezuela's food shortages worsen, the president of the country's Food Industry Chamber has said that authorities ordered producers of milk, pasta, oil, rice, sugar and flour to supply their products to the state stores
The Telegraph, Friday 24 July 2015

Venezuela's embattled government has taken the drastic step of forcing food producers to sell their produce to the state, in a bid to counter the ever-worsening shortages.

Farmers and manufacturers who produce milk, pasta, oil, rice, sugar and flour have been told to supply between 30 per cent and 100 per cent of their products to the state stores. Shortages, rationing and queues outside supermarkets have become a way of life for Venezuelans, as their isolated country battles against rigid currency controls and a shortage of US dollars – making it difficult for Venezuelans to find imported goods.

Pablo Baraybar, president of the Venezuelan Food Industry Chamber, said that the order was illogical, and damaging to Venezuelan consumers.

"Taking products from the supermarkets and shops to hand them over to the state network doesn't help in any way," he said. "And problems like speculating will only get worse, because the foods will be concentrated precisely in the areas where the resellers go.

He pointed to statistics showing that two thirds of hoarders – or "bachaqueros", giant ants, as they are nicknamed in Venezuela – buy their goods from the three state-owned chains, to resell at a profit.

"Consumers will be forced to spend more time in queues, given that the goods will be available in fewer stores."

The state owns 7,245 stores, compared to more than 113,000 in private hands. Mr Baraybar said that many of the private shops were in densely-populated areas, meaning that people will now be forced to make longer journeys to the state stores.

The Chamber has asked the government for a meeting to discuss the plan, which they say they were not informed of.

"This does absolutely nothing to help with the shortages," he said, adding that the solution was for the government to increase national production.
In March, Venezuelans were so worried about food shortages and dimininshing stocks of basic goods, fingerprint scanners were installed in supermarkets in an attempt to crack down on hoarding.

Venezuela’s official rate of inflation hit 64 per cent last year – the highest in the world. The government hides the scale of shortages, but angry consumers regularly post photos of empty shelves on social media.

----------

I really hope the Bernie Sanders crowd takes a big whiff of this. This is what you're asking for people. It's not a joke.
 

Nick M

Black Rifles Matter
Authorized Seller
Contributor
Joined
Sep 9, 2005
Messages
8,812
Likes
15
Location
U.S.
#2
Coming soon to America. Others will fall before us.

[video=youtube;_LZWqrHd3r4]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LZWqrHd3r4[/video]

You can watch the woman in video get tackled in her home by thug police in Katrina evacuation.
 

Nick M

Black Rifles Matter
Authorized Seller
Contributor
Joined
Sep 9, 2005
Messages
8,812
Likes
15
Location
U.S.
#3
On top of all that, we could be headed for another mini-ice age. The data shows a reliable trend. This is part of the reason for the made up deception being rebranded "climate change" and the move The Day After Tomorrow. It is best to live closer to the equator if that happens.
 

Supracentral

Supramania Contributor
Authorized Seller
Contributor
Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Messages
10,541
Likes
5
#4
It's getting better - I mean all those people dying of starvation need places to live:

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...estle-polar-warehouse-as-food-shortages-mount

Venezuela Seizes Nestle, Polar Warehouse to Build Housing
by Anatoly KurmanaevAndrew Rosati
BloombergBusiness
July 30, 2015 — 12:35 PM EDT

Venezuelan soldiers seized a food distribution center rented by companies including Nestle SA, PepsiCo. Inc and Empresas Polar SA in Caracas as the government looks to boost support ahead of elections.

The companies were given two months to remove equipment and stock at the La Yaguara industrial park, which will be converted to social housing, workers said. Several dozen workers of Polar, the largest Venezuelan food company, remain on the premises in protest against the expropriation.

“I’m scared not just for my job but for the entire country,” Beatrice Pellicer, a 24-year-old Polar corporate relations worker, said outside the warehouse sealed by armed police and National Guards. “We all just found out this morning that we have 60 days to leave.”

President Nicolas Maduro in recent months has stepped up attacks on the private sector, which he accuses of profiteering and sabotage, as his popularity wanes ahead of the Dec. 6 congressional elections. He has blamed Polar and other private food companies for the chronic shortages of basic products and spiraling inflation, while maintaining currency and price controls that have made most of national production unprofitable.

Government ‘Terms’

“This is a scare tactic to get private companies to cooperate with the government ahead of the elections: helping them keep the right stores supplied and work on their terms,” Risa Grais-Targow, Latin America political analyst at consultancy Eurasia Group, said by telephone from Washington. “I think the government understands that taking over a company like Polar will create dangerous social dynamics.”

Carmen Arreaza, a 51-year-old elementary school teacher, and a few dozen other government supporters gathered in front of the warehouse to demonstrate support for the expropriation.

“This measure is just and it needs to happen as soon as possible,” Arreaza said. “There is an economic war here and this company, Polar, is at the heart of it. They hide products from the population, and inflate their prices!”

The government had first notified the landlord of plans to expropriate the industrial park in 2013, Nestle spokesman Andres Alegrett said by telephone from Caracas on Thursday. Nestle used the facility to dispatch about 10 percent of its products in the country, supplying sweets and drinks to the western side of Greater Caracas, he said.

“We are working to redirect the products to other facilities across the country,” Alegrett said.

It remains unclear whether the companies will keep the merchandise in the affected warehouses, Polar’s planning manager Douglas Vielma said Thursday afternoon.

The La Yaguara industrial park is also being used by U.S. grain trader Cargill Inc., Mexican bottler Coca-Cola Femsa SAB and industrial gases supplier Praxair Inc.

Spokesmen for PepsiCo., Praxair and Cargill, as well as the Information Ministry, didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment. Coca-Cola Femsa spokesman declined to comment.
 

Supracentral

Supramania Contributor
Authorized Seller
Contributor
Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Messages
10,541
Likes
5
#5
Getting worse:

http://www.wsj.com/articles/venezue...gger-long-lines-hunger-and-looting-1440581400

Venezuela’s Food Shortages Trigger Long Lines, Hunger and Looting
Violent clashes flare in pockets around the country as citizens wait for hours for basics like milk and rice
The Wall Street Journal
World|Latin America
Aug. 26, 2015 5:30 a.m. ET


LA SIBUCARA, Venezuela—Hours after they looted and set fire to a National Guard command post in this sun-baked corner of Venezuela earlier this month, a mob infuriated by worsening food shortages rammed trucks into the smoldering edifice, reducing it mostly to rubble.

The incident was just one of numerous violent clashes that have flared in pockets around the country in recent weeks as Venezuelans wait for hours in long supermarket lines for basics like milk and rice. Shortages have made hunger a palpable concern for many Wayuu Indians who live here at the northern tip of Venezuela’s 1,300-mile border with Colombia.

The soldiers had been deployed to stem rampant food smuggling and price speculation, which President Nicolás Maduro blames for triple-digit inflation and scarcity. But after they seize contraband goods, the troops themselves often become targets of increasingly desperate people.

“What’s certain is that we are going very hungry here and the children are suffering a lot,” said María Palma, a 55-year-old grandmother who on a recent blistering hot day had been standing in line at the grocery store since 3 a.m. before walking away empty-handed at midday.

In a national survey, the pollster Consultores 21 found 30% of Venezuelans eating two or fewer meals a day during the second quarter of this year, up from 20% in the first quarter. Around 70% of people in the study also said they had stopped buying some basic food item because it had become unavailable or too expensive.In past years, when oil prices were high, Venezuela’s leftist government flooded markets with subsidized goods ranging from cooking oil to diapers. It gave citizens in border towns like La Sibucara not only access to cheap supplies, but also a source of income as many people trafficked products—including nearly free gasoline—to neighboring Colombia, drawing handsome profits.

With the government now struggling to pay for imports, there is less inventory to go around. In recent days, Mr. Maduro upped the ante by ordering troops along the border to seize contraband, deporting hundreds of Colombians whom the government blames for smuggling and shortages.

Armed soldiers monitor supermarkets as part of an effort the president calls “Operation People’s Liberation.” More than 6,000 alleged smugglers have been arrested this year, according to the attorney general’s office. Images of soldiers posing with handcuffed suspects and stacks of decommissioned goods are splashed on state media.

“We’re going to get to the root of the problem,” Mr. Maduro said in a national address last week after a shootout with smugglers in the frontier state of Táchira left three National Guard troops injured and pushed Venezuela to shut key border crossings.

The smugglers targeted by the government crackdown are called bachaqueros, named after a leaf-cutter ant that can carry many times its weight. The word, first used here in the northwestern state of Zulia, has become part of daily national parlance as a label for Venezuelans who buy price-controlled goods and resell them for profit on the black market.

While the government blames the shortages on bachaqueros, economists say they are the consequence of price controls and a broken economic model that has left average Venezuelans with diminishing employment options.

“The people that used to give us work—the private companies, the rich—have all gone,” said Ms. Palma in La Sibucara, adding that she also occasionally traffics goods to get by. “It’s not the greatest business but we don’t have work and we have to find a way to eat.”

Earlier this month, Venezuela’s military raided homes and warehouse around the town, seizing tons of allegedly hoarded goods that were destined to leave Venezuela or be resold on the black market for well above the state-set price.

Lisandro Uriana, who had a black eye and a bandaged leg, said he and two friends were badly beaten up when a neighbor’s house was raided. “They didn’t say or ask us anything,” recalled the 46-year-old Wayuu father of four, who lives in a tin-roofed house of two rooms. “They just beat us and we couldn’t defend ourselves because they were armed and were many. I don’t even smuggle…and now I can’t even get up to work.”

The day of the raids, neighbors said residents pleaded with troops at the National Guard command post to distribute seized food to non-smugglers but were turned away. An angry mob soon formed, sending soldiers fleeing before they attacked the office and even stripped it of scrap metal.

“These are just some isolated cases,” Manuel Graterol, a National Guard general overseeing operations in La Sibucara on a recent day, said, blaming the unrest and the bachaquero phenomenon on opponents of Mr. Maduro’s government.

“Many of them are being shameless,” said Gen. Graterol. “They’re committing treason against our country, taking food and crossing the border.”

But such food fights have broken out in numerous small municipalities around the state of Zulia. In the nearby town of Sinamaica, the ground floor of the mayor’s office was set on fire in early August following a wave of unrest that included gangs looting delivery trucks. The unrest, locals said, began after police detained a truck loaded with rice.

Street vendor Robert Guzmán, wearing a red pro-government T-shirt, said the sacking was justified. “We are very peaceful people,” Mr. Guzmán said of his Wayuu community, “but what happened was an act of desperation. I think this is going to get worse.”

Resident Yusleidy Márquez said she too fears the worst. The basket of subsidized food the government gives her mother every 15 days only feeds her family for two days. Lately, she only eats a cornmeal patty for lunch because she can’t afford more.

“I think we’re going to die of hunger,” she said.

---

Bernie would be proud. Equality at last!
 

suprarx7nut

YotaMD.com author
Authorized Seller
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
Messages
4,044
Likes
67
Location
Arizona
#7
And here we go - rock bottom:

http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2016/02/12/venezuela-has-run-out-of-food/

So yea, vote for Bernie if this is what you want to get to...
With the race as it stands I'm seeing Trump or a weaker, slightly less polarizing Repub going against Hillary or Bernie.

All of them stand for an intrusive government in one form or another.

Is there really any meaningful difference between any of the main candidates at this point? We're all losing no matter what.

I think 2016 will be the best example of my lifetime where you can vote for a 3rd party candidate getting nearly no votes or you can vote in favor of an over-reaching government in flavor A or B.
 

Piratetip

Far From Maddening Crowds
Staff member
Super Moderator
Authorized Seller
Joined
Dec 30, 2005
Messages
1,620
Likes
142
Location
MKE, WI
#8
Is there really any meaningful difference between any of the main candidates at this point? We're all losing no matter what.
Nope, nothing but bickering, finger pointing and impaired ideas from all sides.
People are living a fantasy if they believe otherwise.
 

te72

Classifieds Moderator
Staff member
Authorized Seller
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
6,614
Likes
5
Location
WHYoming
#9
You know, I gotta say it's good to see you posting again Mike, but man... it's some sobering stuff. Don't you hate being right all the time when it comes to this stuff?

On a related note, I recently read up on the Russian revolution of the early 20th century. Ended up going back about as far as the mid 1800's, up through the end of the 1920's. Some interesting history there, and interesting to see some similarities with their foot shortages, happening again in a modern day socialist country.

Scares the pants off me to think we're pretty much headed in a similar direction. Socialism and a Russian style revolution on one hand, or early 1930's Germany on the other. Boy, we're headed for interesting times...
 

Supracentral

Supramania Contributor
Authorized Seller
Contributor
Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Messages
10,541
Likes
5
#10
Let's double down on bad ideas:

http://www.seattletimes.com/business/venezuela-hikes-minimum-wage-30-percent-amid-economic-crunch/

Venezuela hikes minimum wage 30 percent amid economic crunch
The Seattle Times
4/30/2016

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Venezuela’s president is ordering a 30 percent increase in the minimum wage, the latest move by the socialist government to grapple with high inflation and economic stagnation.

The boost announced Saturday night by President Nicolas Maduro comes after a 25 percent increase on March 1.

The new increase is effective Sunday, which is International Labor Day, and will push the minimum wage to 15,051 bolivars a month. That is about $1,500 at the official exchange rate, but is around $50 at the current black market rate, which largely sets prices of goods for Venezuelans.

Venezuela’s oil export-dependent economy shrank 5.7 percent last year, shortages of basic goods multiplied and prices soared. The government has instituted rolling blackouts and state employees are working only two days a week to conserve electricity.



I'm looking at you left coast... This is your end game.


You know, I gotta say it's good to see you posting again Mike, but man... it's some sobering stuff. Don't you hate being right all the time when it comes to this stuff?
Yes, it's painful. It's one of the reasons I don't post as much as I used to... Get tired of tilting at windmills...

This pretty much explains it:

http://www.supramania.com/forums/showthread.php?88574-This-is-what-*my*-life-feels-like...

It's more than a little frustrating.
 

Supracentral

Supramania Contributor
Authorized Seller
Contributor
Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Messages
10,541
Likes
5
#11
https://panampost.com/sabrina-marti...sidents-resort-to-hunting-dogs-on-the-street/

Hungry Venezuelans Hunt Dogs, Cats, Pigeons as Food Runs Out
Economic Crisis and Food Shortages Lead to Looting and Hunting Stray Animals
MAY 4, 2016 AT 8:41 AM
Sabrina Martin

Ramón Muchacho, Mayor of Chacao in Caracas, said the streets of the capital of Venezuela are filled with people killing animals for food.

Through Twitter, Muchacho reported that in Venezuela, it is a “painful reality” that people “hunt cats, dogs and pigeons” to ease their hunger.

Capture.JPG

People are also reportedly gathering vegetables from the ground and trash to eat as well.

The crisis in Venezuela is worsening everyday due in part to shortages reaching 70 percent. This to go along with the world’s highest level of inflation.

The population’s desperation has begun to show, with looting and robberies for food increasing all the time. This Sunday, May 1, six Venezuelan military officials were arrested for stealing goats to ease their hunger, as there was no food at the Fort Manaure military base.

The week before, various regions of the country saw widespread looting of shopping malls, pharmacies, supermarkets and food trucks, all while people chanted “we are hungry.”

The Venezuelan Chamber of Food (Cavidea) said many businesses only have 15 days worth of inventory. Production has been effected as a result of a shortage of raw materials, as well as exhausted national and international supply resources.

Supermarket employees confirmed food does not arrive at the same rate as it did before, and that people’s inability to get enough is a daily struggle.

Supermarkets are registered into a system in such a way that they are not permitted to sell Venezuelans food 15 days since their purchase of the same product. As a result, long food lines have formed all over the country, with many people reselling their share to earn an “extra income.”
 

Nick M

Black Rifles Matter
Authorized Seller
Contributor
Joined
Sep 9, 2005
Messages
8,812
Likes
15
Location
U.S.
#16
In case you missed it, UAL has joined the other airlines in dropping their route since Venezuela has not paid any of the billion dollars or so they owe to UAL. They were the last ones.