The TEMS System and HKS EAC-T Bible

Drake69

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The TEMS Bible: by Drake69

The TEMS system (short for Toyota Electronically Modulated Suspension) is an advanced suspension system found on many of the 3rd generation MKIII Supras and the Soarers of that era as well as newer Toyota vehicles like the Sequoia and Land Cruiser, and was and still is an impressive feature. The TEMS system uses a series of actuators controlled by variously placed sensors and a TEMS computer to improve the suspension of the car in the more aggressive profiles, such as cornering, acceleration, and deceleration, by increasing or decreasing the damper for each shock. This does not mean that the suspension can be “lifted” like other electronically controlled systems for ride height like the TEMS on the Soarers can, but it does allow the handling of the vehicle to be more flexible in tight situations. Softer settings are for general cruising, harder settings for performance.

From the Toyota Supra Reference Manual (TSRM), here is a link to troubleshooting TEMS problems…

http://www.cygnusx1.net/Supra/Library/TSRM/MK3/manual.aspx?S=FA&P=29

Some important items to note: When the TEMS system encounters an error, either due to a loose connection, frayed wiring, etc…, the TEMS indicator located on the dashboard will flash all three of its lights, indicating trouble in the TEMS computer. When driving, if the TEMS system is flashing an error and a turn is made that would normally engage TEMS, the indicator will go to one flashing LED for the direction of the turn, such as right side for right-hand turns, and left for left. There are a number of faults that can cause this error, so follow the above link to properly troubleshoot the problem. Also, to ensure the TEMS system is working as expected, turn the ignition key to “Acc” or “On” without starting the vehicle, make sure there is no sound inside the cab, and cycle through the two options on the controller. An audible “click” can be heard when switching modes. Note that any changes made to your TEMS system should be done with the “sport” button engaged as recommended by Toyota prior to work.

Components of the TEMS system are:

1: Four actuators with covers located at the four shock points (also known as strut towers) inside the vehicle. These actuators control the dampening pressure to the shocks at each strut point. Two are found in the engine bay above and behind the wheelwells, and the other two are found underneath the plastic trim by the rear speakers in the cargo area.

2: Four sensors, listed below, in various locations in the vehicle.

3: The TEMS computer, located in the passenger-side cargo bay area beneath the trim, towards the back corner.

4: The TEMS controller, located in the center console, with two buttons that adjust shock firmness, marked “Normal” and “Sport”.

5: A wire junction between the TEMS computer and controller, located in the passenger-side kicker panel which is above and behind the ECT (Electronically Controlled Transmission) ECU.

6: The TEMS LED panel, integrated into the dashboard, that displays the current TEMS-level setting. Any errors to the TEMS system will cause these indicators to flash.

What’s surprising about this system is that it was not FIRST used on Supras, rather the system was initially designed for the Z10 Series Soarers from 1981 – 1985, as well as the Cressida models of those matching years. In the middle part of 1986 when the first MKIIIs rolled onto the market, Toyota included the TEMS system in the Sport editions of the Supra along with an improved limited-slip differential. As there were many changes in the packages offered for these cars, it is just as common to find one in an N/A (naturally aspirated) as it is for the Turbo version, with the Turbo version more likely to have it available since it became a factory option for Turbos in later years.

This system allowed the driver to select between “Normal” (soft) and “Sport” (medium) modes via a 2-button switch, along with a computer-selected “Firm” (hard) mode for more aggressive driving. Depending on freeway speeds, the TEMS computer would set the shocks to either soft or medium for smooth driving at highway speeds, followed by hard for increased cornering, hard braking, and sudden acceleration/deceleration. Hard steering input such as those in twisted curves would often trip the sensor as well, stiffening the ride to accommodate the change in driving stance. However, if the “Sport” button was already engaged by the driver, the system would only select between medium and hard settings as based on driving conditions, allowing for faster response.

The four sensors which assist in the various settings are:

1: Throttle Position Sensor (TPS): for anti-squat
2: Brake sensor: for anti-dive (nose-forward during hard braking)
3: Steering-angle sensor: for anti-roll (side-to-side)
4: Speed sensor: for anti-squat and “Firm” setting

In 1989, several changes were made to the Supra to improve various options, and the TEMS system was no exception. Toyota reduced the size of the actuators to each strut and increased response times to the computer so that handling became more efficient. As a drawback to this, European and Japanese-owned Supras who swapped out their older actuators for the newer ones noticed no appreciable changes in suspension with the U.S. the exception to the rule. As a result, U.S. owners of the older model MKIII’s need only to replace their actuators with the ‘89+ ones to improve their drivability, whereas other models required the TEMS computer from newer model cars to be swapped out as well. There is no mention of the sensors needing to be swapped out, and as such have not been included here.

Some aftermarket items were made available for TEMS, not the least of which is the HKS TEMS Controller, or EAC-T. This rare item, no longer in production, is a 4-button switch as opposed to the 2-button affair found on the center console of most Supras, and allows for the setting of the suspension to full “Firm” mode, a setting only reserved for the TEMS computer itself. Still a highly sought after item fetching anywhere from $300 ~ $600 on eBay and various forums, its usefulness has been overshadowed by a wiring mod in the fuse relay box that allows for direct control of the “Firm” setting, and when turned off will resume normal operation. The link below is a document describing how to do this mod:

http://www.supras.com/06/techcenter/display.php?QID=44

Another aftermarket item and one woefully needed is Tokico Illumina II shocks which replace the factory shocks with a lesser expensive alternative to OEMs. As of this writing, only the Illumina II’s are a direct replacement for the TEMS shocks, and as such, most owners opt for removing the TEMS system altogether and replace it with static shocks or manually adjustable ones (some even decide to get the newer electronic shocks instead for more control and more options available, but this is very costly!). Some coils may also need to be replaced to adjust for ride height and tire fitment inside the wheelwells, but more research is needed before it can be included here as compatability may also be an issue.

A third aftermarket item is the Blitz controller, which is very similar to the HKS controller as it performs the same function. As this is even rarer than the HKS, no discernable info is available at this time as it might have been more readily available to the European and Japanese market than here. Most pictures of the Blitz controller show only two buttons as opposed to the standard four of the HKS, but due to lack of info this will not be included in this faq.

The HKS TEMS Controller – EAC-T:

HKS USA was kind enough to make a controller for the TEMS system to give owners more control over their suspension by allowing for a third button press that engaged the computer-only “Firm” setting for the dampers. This allowed for even greater control and performance over the normal 2-button setting, but HKS stopped selling the system sometime around 1999. As a result, demand for this controller still runs high with used items selling for $300+ on the forums and as much as $500 ~ $600+ on eBay. Often, these controllers will change hands multiple times as is common in the used market.

Due to their used nature, damaged HKS controllers can have:

1: Hacked-into harnesses
2: Pulled/frayed wires
3: Unresponsive buttons
4: Lighted buttons no longer lit
5: Missing instructions

Out of all these, about 99% of the EAC-Ts being sold are missing the actual instructions for proper installation, and as such this can cause the unit to not work as designed. Fortunately, the instructions are fairly simple and will be posted here for clarity.



Here in this picture you can see the front face of the EAC-T. The last 2 buttons are ones most people are familiar with, since they are already featured on all TEMS systems currently installed in Supras, “Normal At Soft” and “Sport At Medium”. The button to the far left is an “On/Off” button of sorts that allows you to “Manually” set the EAC-T to the level you want, or go back to the “Automatic” settings as part of normal driving. The “Hard” button is the “firm” setting once reserved by the TEMS computer and is now under direct control by the driver.



A variation of the front faceplate shows a small diagram connecting the various buttons together for operation.



Here is a lighted view of the EAC-T, behind the shifter.

As of this writing, there are two different models of the EAC-T (aside from the varying faceplates) that have one very important difference. To display the differences, here are two pictures to compare.



HKS with the wiring loom and ground plug visible.



HKS with the wiring loom (circled in BLUE), ground plug, AND an additional plugin for power, identified by the RED circle (black/white wire).

It is surmised that the older HKS units had the additional wire as needed to supply power to the EAC-T, and the newer HKS units removed this wire because the loom in the kicker panel supplied this same power (this may ALSO be model specific by year of car, as owners of the newer units in Supras after ’89 did not need to supply power to the new units because it derived power from the loom.). What is important is that power HAS to be supplied to the EAC-T for it to work as designed, as without power it will cause an error condition in the TEMS computer when switched from “Auto” to “Manual”, forcing the three LED lights on the indicator panel to flash. Also note that the ground plug is consistant in both types of EAC-Ts, and as such have to be grounded to the frame to function as well. Since the ground plug is located at the end of the loom in the kicker panel, two ground points, the screw that attaches the ECT ECU to the frame and the screw that reattaches the kicker panel, can be used to ground the unit.

 
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Drake69

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The TEMS System and HKS EAC-T Bible - pt. 2

For older units with a separate power (black/white) wire or on pre-’89 Supras: Since the power source, either through the loom or separate wiring, has to be 12vDC to the ignition, the most common place to splice into the unit is where the old TEMS controller was inside the center console. When this controller is removed, a gray plug with three wires coming out is left behind. One of these three is a RED/BLACK wire that supplies the needed power to the replacement unit (NOT the small gauge black/white wire. That does not supply sufficient power to power the EAC-T!). Splice this wire into the thicker 18-gauge black/white wire on the loom going into the EAC-T to power up the unit. The remaining wires from the old controller and the black/white wire going to the kicker panel can be “capped off” so that they will not cause interference with any other wiring inside the console. For the remaining black ground wire, ground it out to the frame underneath the plastic kicker panel. The 10mm nut that reattaches the kicker panel (with the bolt welded onto the frame bracket) is an excellent ground for this.

For newer model Supras: Power should be available through the loom going to the kicker panel. Attach the loom as directed below and ground out the black wire properly to the frame to supply power to the unit. If you do not receive power to the unit, consider splicing into the loom and powering the unit from the red/black wire from the old TEMS controller.





The Wiring Loom: A notoriously hard part to work with, the loom has two plugs on it which goes in between a connected wire loom by the floorboard. This wiring harness attaches into a factory connected cable located underneath the glovebox and behind the passenger-side kicker panel. It’s a tight area to get into, and as such visibility is poor.

To install the harness:

1: Remove the 10mm nut in the back corner of the floorboard against the foot-side kicker panel.

2: Remove the three screws that drop the baseboard underneath the glovebox.

3: Remove the screw and 10mm nut in the bottom right of the glovebox to free up the top brace of the ECT ECU.

4: Remove AT LEAST two of the four trim screws in the door jamb to free up the bottom corner of the kicker and pull it free of the area.

5: Once you can see the ECT ECU, remove the bottom 10mm nut that retains the ECU to the frame of the car, gently pulling the ECT away from the side panel area.

6: Use a flashlight and a mechanic’s mirror to illuminate the area behind and above the ECT ECU location. You will see a bundle of wires with a white plug connecting them together. CAREFULLY disconnect the plugs from each other by pinching them and pulling them apart. It may be necessary to pull out the passenger-side seat to facilitate this, or you can use steady GENTLE pressure to pull apart the harness plugs.

7: Plug the EAC-T harness into both ends of the wire loom and make sure the connections are tight on both sides. You will hear an audible click when connecting up the HKS to the loom part going to the center console.

8: Choose a proper ground point and ground out the remaining black wire to the frame.

9: Reattach the trim pieces and the ECT ECU, making sure the ECT is secured properly.



The controller: First and foremost, run the wiring harness behind and then underneath the center plastic trim area to get the EAC-T to the center console. Once this is done…

1: Remove the two screws behind the front seats that go into the back part of the console.

2: Lift the felt lining of the coin/drink box in the center console and remove the screw found there.

3: Remove the screw to the front of the center console that attaches it to the gearbox and middle dash trim.

4: Consider removing the middle dash trim. This will give you more options to store remaining lengths of wire loom such as wrapping it around and under the gearshift, stuffing it more behind the middle lower floorboard area, etc… Removing the middle trim is only a series of five screws, one underneath the ignition key, two behind the ashtray, and the last at the juncture between the gearbox and center console.

5: Pull up on the center console to free it from the gearbox area. Be careful not to yank up hard, as the old TEMS controller will still be attached. Carefully turn the console on its side and unplug the old controller from its power loom and, depending on your power preferences, make note of its location.

6: Run the loom up and over to the socket created by the missing controller and push the HKS controller through the hole. This will be a tight fit so place pliers inside the hole to spread it open, widening the hole for the controller to go all the way through.

7: Again, depending on power requirements, consider tapping into the red/black wire from the leftover TEMS controller to supply power to the EAC-T.

8: Once fitment is complete, reattach the center console and any other trim areas you had to remove.

When completed, supplying power to the unit can be done by turning the ignition key to “Acc” or “On”. If the buttons do not light up once power is supplied check your power and ground areas for faults. If needed, use a multimeter to check your power source, and make sure you are properly grounded. Once you have proper power you will be able to manually select your firmness from soft all the way to firm for a more controlled ride. Good Luck!!

Thanks go out to:

Mytmk3, Bluepearl, Woody1989, Crisp, MarkIII4Me, SupraMan1987, Aljordan, Trnsprtr, 87witmoreboost, and all the folks at SM that I might have missed!!!
 
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JDMMA70

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Great Post!
Just want to add some info the Soarers TEMS system allowed the car to be raised. I have a video of it ill edit my post once I find it.
 

SUPRASTEVE

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So where would you find this HKS TEMS system? Does it cost like about $1000 dollars?
 

7mLove

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i have the hks tems on mine but i have yet to have all 3 lights lit even when in sport or when i switch it to hard or manual and hard? i have a 92 and im pretty sure i have the 89+ tems controller ill check tommorow. but what could be wrong with mine?
 

Drake69

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Important first question. Your HKS buttons all light up, correct? If you are not seeing your HKS buttons lit up you aren't getting power to the controller.

Secondly, check the plugs going into the harness under the kick panel to make sure everything's tight. If you remove and reseat the plugs it should readily clear up the problem. Also check the wires going into the back of the controller itself. Make sure everything is connected as a loose solder or pulled wire could lose connectivity to a particular setting on the HKS.

It's also possible you could have frayed or crimped wires in the HKS harness. If you don't see any obvious breaks in the line you may have to cut away the wrapping until you can inspect all the wires in the connection (just make sure you rewrap it up as carefully as you can, or use that accordion plastic tubing to keep everything nice and neat.). Also check for cracks in the HKS plugs themselves as well as the cable it's connecting into to make sure you see no loose or damaged ends.

When all else fails, reconnect your old TEMS controller back in and test it to make sure you see all three lights lit (like going hard into a corner or heavy braking while set on "Sport".). After a few heavy-handed maneuvers you don't see three lights, then the problem is in the TEMS computer or elsewhere.
 

Yblegal91t

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nice writeup. I still need to get mine working as I have just plugged it in the old harness and grounded it with no luck. I do have an older unit with just the 1 plugin. So what is told i now need to run an extra wire from the old harness red/black wire (power) back to that red circled area since i do not have the newer unit? Just making sure. thanks.
 

Drake69

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nice writeup. I still need to get mine working as I have just plugged it in the old harness and grounded it with no luck. I do have an older unit with just the 1 plugin. So what is told i now need to run an extra wire from the old harness red/black wire (power) back to that red circled area since i do not have the newer unit? Just making sure. thanks.
Yup, that should do it. Make sure you use a voltimeter to source out 12vDC to that red/black wire from the old TEMS connection in the console so that your power is consistant. Once you have proper power and ground taken care of, it'll light up all the buttons and be ready to go.
 

7mLove

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Important first question. Your HKS buttons all light up, correct? If you are not seeing your HKS buttons lit up you aren't getting power to the controller.

Secondly, check the plugs going into the harness under the kick panel to make sure everything's tight. If you remove and reseat the plugs it should readily clear up the problem. Also check the wires going into the back of the controller itself. Make sure everything is connected as a loose solder or pulled wire could lose connectivity to a particular setting on the HKS.

It's also possible you could have frayed or crimped wires in the HKS harness. If you don't see any obvious breaks in the line you may have to cut away the wrapping until you can inspect all the wires in the connection (just make sure you rewrap it up as carefully as you can, or use that accordion plastic tubing to keep everything nice and neat.). Also check for cracks in the HKS plugs themselves as well as the cable it's connecting into to make sure you see no loose or damaged ends.

When all else fails, reconnect your old TEMS controller back in and test it to make sure you see all three lights lit (like going hard into a corner or heavy braking while set on "Sport".). After a few heavy-handed maneuvers you don't see three lights, then the problem is in the TEMS computer or elsewhere.
okay ill check everything im pretty sure its all connected. i have a 92 with factory tems and my hks has only 1 plug conector at the controller itself. is this the wrong one?
 

87MK111Supra

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Is it possible to convert a car that didn't have TEMS? I have a parts car with the complete system that worked so I'm going to try and do it but just want to make sure its possible. One thing I've run into is I don't know where the 4 wires go on the back of the gauge cluster. They are black, red, green, and blue but I only see 2 TEMS marked spots on the gauge cluster. Thanks.
 

Drake69

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Is it possible to convert a car that didn't have TEMS? I have a parts car with the complete system that worked so I'm going to try and do it but just want to make sure its possible. One thing I've run into is I don't know where the 4 wires go on the back of the gauge cluster. They are black, red, green, and blue but I only see 2 TEMS marked spots on the gauge cluster. Thanks.
It's not something I've heard done completely, since not only do you need the actuators, controller, computer, wiring, dash lights, and shocks, but also the internal sensors on the engine block as well. The wiring diagrams should be available at the cygnus website, and that would give you something to research on the conversion. But I'm sure having a donor vehicle will go a long way to get what you're looking for.
 

87MK111Supra

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Ok, well currently I have Tokico Illuminas with Eibahcs, the 2 front and 2 rear strut actuators, the dash lights, the tems console controller, and the wiring is already there for the strut actuators which is strange as the wiring for the controller is not. What other sensors and whatnot do I need?
 

Drake69

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Drake69 said:
The four sensors which assist in the various settings are:

1: Throttle Position Sensor (TPS): for anti-squat
2: Brake sensor: for anti-dive (nose-forward during hard braking)
3: Steering-angle sensor: for anti-roll (side-to-side)
4: Speed sensor: for anti-squat and “Firm” setting
http://www.cygnusx1.net/Supra/Library/TSRM/MK3/manual.aspx?S=FA&P=29

Start with this first, then go to the section on electrical wiring diagrams. The sensors should be easy to trace out IF you can follow the diagram. Since I have never installed a full TEMS system, I can't tell you exactly what you need or where it all is. I can only go by the TSRM and what I learned about TEMS.

Hope this helps.
 
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BOOSTEDSUPRA

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in you picture of the unit being lit up, mine is functioning, lights on the dash work, the little green indicators "above" the buttons work, and will turn to red. but the buttons themselves do not light up...i just paid alot of money for this off someone on here being told it worked fine, im trying to keep my cool about this. anything i should check?

also, this write up helped out in a few areas i was scratching my head. props to the op.
 

Drake69

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in you picture of the unit being lit up, mine is functioning, lights on the dash work, the little green indicators "above" the buttons work, and will turn to red. but the buttons themselves do not light up...i just paid alot of money for this off someone on here being told it worked fine, im trying to keep my cool about this. anything i should check?
anyone have an idea as to why this isnt lighting up?? faulty, bad soldering?
Ok, you say it works. When you select "Hard" mode does all three lights come on at the dash? If they start flashing then something is wrong, usually it's the unit not getting enough power. Also check each mode by selecting them and waiting to see if it lights correctly. If any of them cause the dash panel to start flashing, then something is wrong.

Also, the lights in the buttons aren't terribly bright. Mine only really show up at night.
 

rfurgy

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Not sure if you can help me but I'll give it a try anyway.

I'm looking to find out what exactly the three wires from the ECU to the TEMS do (L1, L2, L3). I need to figure out what kind of signal was being communicated between the two.

I'm already assuming it works in conjunction with the ECU seeing the TPS and Speed sensors are wired to the ECU. Does the ECU just use an on/off configuration when specific conditions are met? Or is it more than that?

Any help would be awesome!
 

Drake69

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Not sure if you can help me but I'll give it a try anyway.

I'm looking to find out what exactly the three wires from the ECU to the TEMS do (L1, L2, L3). I need to figure out what kind of signal was being communicated between the two.

I'm already assuming it works in conjunction with the ECU seeing the TPS and Speed sensors are wired to the ECU. Does the ECU just use an on/off configuration when specific conditions are met? Or is it more than that?

Any help would be awesome!
You are going to need a wiring diagram from the FSM for that. I did not get that in-depth with the engineering of the ECU-to-TEMS system, so I would have no earthly idea what to tell you. Check Cygnus's TSFSM for your electrical wiring needs.
 

bhmsupra

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I have an install on a HKS TEMS to do so SUBSCRIBED to this great thread. Only way I know to subscribe is to post. Sorry for bringing this post back to life.
 

yhatzee89

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Has anyone ever changed the LEDs in the controller? Red lights make me nervous lol, and blue goes with the rest of my dash a lot better

Also - has anybody ever had the stencils on the buttons redone?
 

yhatzee89

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You are going to need a wiring diagram from the FSM for that. I did not get that in-depth with the engineering of the ECU-to-TEMS system, so I would have no earthly idea what to tell you. Check Cygnus's TSFSM for your electrical wiring needs.
Just read this. Does this mean that my TEMS won't work with a soarer 1JZ swap?
 

Drake69

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Has anyone ever changed the LEDs in the controller? Red lights make me nervous lol, and blue goes with the rest of my dash a lot better

Also - has anybody ever had the stencils on the buttons redone?
Never had to do this, and I've not heard anyone else having to do it. Would be interesting to see what you come up with.

Just read this. Does this mean that my TEMS won't work with a soarer 1JZ swap?
It's possible. As I said in my earlier post, I don't know what the effect would be after swapping the engine, but I would suspect it won't AUTOMATICALLY switch over based on the missing sensors.

It SHOULD still be selectable, something I get to test out when I finish my 2JZ swap. I'll let everyone know about that later on.
 

yhatzee89

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So I'll be able to switch between modes, but if I start getting on it or try coming to a sudden stop, I'm in for whatever mode is selected without it bumping up to stiff? Best guess?

I was looking at mine tonight and it looks like i would have to melt the hot glue that holds the circuit board and buttons into the plastic housing, then it's a matter of finding new blue LEDs that work and soldering them in ( I hate electrical work :/) I think it would be worth it to even leave the sport mode one red lol
 

Drake69

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So I'll be able to switch between modes, but if I start getting on it or try coming to a sudden stop, I'm in for whatever mode is selected without it bumping up to stiff? Best guess?

I was looking at mine tonight and it looks like i would have to melt the hot glue that holds the circuit board and buttons into the plastic housing, then it's a matter of finding new blue LEDs that work and soldering them in ( I hate electrical work :/) I think it would be worth it to even leave the sport mode one red lol
Exactly. It should still be selectable, you'd just lose the automatic functions when the car pitches and yaws.

Since this has become a really-expensive item, you're thinking of doing something I wouldn't even attempt on a good day. Best of luck and post up the results!
 

crisp

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EDIT: I have removed my "ill-conceived" post, as OP's first couple posts very succinctly explain the system and little (or no) value was added.

-crisp
 
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Drake69

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That could VERY WELL be true, as you did experience it. I'm sure the ECU does some sort of calculation that would adjust for the speed differences, but it also uses the sensors for G-forces that are applied to the car when it does a maneuver at speed.

Great point!
 

crisp

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That could VERY WELL be true, as you did experience it. I'm sure the ECU does some sort of calculation that would adjust for the speed differences, but it also uses the sensors for G-forces that are applied to the car when it does a maneuver at speed.

Great point!
EDIT: Drake was gracious with his reply to my previous post, but again, I added little to his exceptional first couple posts and have removed an additional post I made here.

-crisp
 
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3p141592654

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Its all in the first post of this thread....

The four sensors which assist in the various settings are:

1: Throttle Position Sensor (TPS): for anti-squat
2: Brake sensor: for anti-dive (nose-forward during hard braking)
3: Steering-angle sensor: for anti-roll (side-to-side)
4: Speed sensor: for anti-squat and “Firm” setting
 

crisp

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Its all in the first post of this thread....

The four sensors which assist in the various settings are:
LOL! Let me now wipe the EGG off my face! (How short my OLD memory has become!)

...my apologies for the ignorant posts... I shall be donning sack-cloth and ashes for the rest of the day.;)

Carry on...

EDIT: As a follow-up, I edited out my earlier "ill-fated" posts.

-crisp
 
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yhatzee89

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"The TEMS system (short for Toyota Electronically Modulated Suspension) is an advanced suspension system found on many of the 3rd generation MKIII Supras and the Soarers of that era as well as newer Toyota vehicles like the Sequoia and Land Cruiser, and was and still is an impressive feature"

So is it possible to get an ECU from a TEMS + 1JZ equipped soarer and possibly have it work as stock? Just a thought
 

crisp

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And no sweat Crisp, it's all good!
Thanks, Drake! (Tickled you used a couple shots of mine in the opening posts! Honored to be a part of the TEMS/EAC-T history!) :)


-crisp
 

crisp

existentialincrementalist
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Crisp, have you ever attempted to open up any of the HKS pieces?
yhatzee, some, yes. There are sometimes "option functions" controlled by dip switches that are not explained publically in their literature. (Although some seem to be "hermetically sealed" as well, perhaps?) LOL!

-crisp
 

yhatzee89

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yhatzee, some, yes. There are sometimes "option functions" controlled by dip switches that are not explained publically in their literature. (Although some seem to be "hermetically sealed" as well, perhaps?) LOL!

-crisp
Have you ever replaced an LED in any of them? The EAC-T doesn't seem to be sealed as well lol, just some hot melt glue
 

crisp

existentialincrementalist
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Have you ever replaced an LED in any of them? The EAC-T doesn't seem to be sealed as well lol, just some hot melt glue
I have not. My TEMS EAC-T system has been working flawlessly on the car since installed in the early '90s. One reason I am such a fan of HKS. :)

-crisp
 

yhatzee89

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I have no idea on that. I truly don't know what Soarers have and can't even guess at compatibility.

And no sweat Crisp, it's all good!
Was scrolling and found this:

http://www.supras.nl/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=34&Itemid=50

"TEMS

Some cars come equipped with the TEMS system. In order to keep this fully functional we need to feed the TEMS ECU the right input signals from the JZ ECU. Let's see what is needed when we swap the ECU.

Connector 'B'
1 Speed signal from Combination meter Original MA7
2


3 M+ signal for TEMS actuators
MA7
4 +B from ECU 1G (15A)
MA7
5 Sport switch
MA7
6


7 GND
MA7
8


9 M- signal for TEMS actuators
MA7
10 SOL for TEMS actuators
MA7
Connector 'H'
1 TEM check signal for check connector Depends on what check box we're using Hyb
2 SS1 from steering sensor
MA7
3 SS2 from steering sensor
MA7
4 L3 from ECU Need to be made custom Add
5 L2 from ECU Need to be made custom Add
6 VS signal from steering sensor
MA7
7 'Hard' led signal
MA7
8 'Soft' led signal
MA7
9 'Normal' led signal
MA7
10 Stop signal from stop light switch
MA7
11


12 L1 from ECU Need to be made custom Add

As you can see another easy transplant. Only signals that needs to be made custom are the L1,L2 and L3 signals currently generated by the 7M ECU. Not much of a hassle I would say, we already needed to make those when we were going with the 7M ECT. Special design I would say. The rest is just plain easy!"

So it appears that this guy figured it out...?