The Kamikaizen Great Unpoochening

Kamikaizen

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#1
It's been a fairly long while since I introduced myself and my $1100 basket case. In that time I have been waging war against Previous Owner Repairs™and have finally come close to having an MA70 that's willing to be a car on a consistent basis.

So, onward with The Saga So Far:

threequarterfront.jpg
There she is in all her 30 years old glory. By some miracle the car was, aside from the rims and a crappily welded in cat, 100% bone stock. Forgive the stupid Dutch angle, I was exhausted at the time and I'm no photographer. :p

Turbo, slushbox, targa, and no ABS. This was the exact format I wanted aside from the gearbox, but that's an easy fix for the future. The exterior trim is a bit schizophrenic, yet it still had the lower front lip. However, the reasons it was $1100: The transmission hemorrhaged ATF to the tune of it being undriveable without going Mad Max with a barrel of ATF in the back and a hose going straight to the dipstick tube to keep it fed. It also had a ragingly persistent misfire at about 3400 at anything aside from WOT, and it had the customary valve cover and CPS o-ring leaks to ensure the front subframe was well lubricated. Also cruise control as well as overdrive didn't work, because there just weren't enough presenting issues.

So first order of business was the transmission. Right away after dropping it the first problem was obvious; whoever installed it didn't fully seat the torque converter, munging its snout as well as the oil pump. So I had the torque converter rebuilt, hunted down a fresh oil pump and hauled all of it over to my driveline shop for a much needed rebuild. In the meantime I went through the EWD to figure out the cruise control issue, since that is a feature I do want to retain. And luckily it turned out to be pretty easy: The trans isn't original to the car, as evidenced both by junkyard grease pen and the fact that the speed sender in the tail housing was the ABS 20 tooth square wave variety, whereas mine needed the sine wave speed sender. After sourcing the right one and slapping that in along with the fresh box and managed to get back that badly needed 4th gear. My trans shop even reflattened the oil pan's mating surface so an actual gasket works instead of needing RTV. Hasn't leaked a drop since.

What decided to evade my efforts to suss out was that misfire. One of the coil packs was basically close to dead, which surely wasn't helping matters. And seeing the cost of a 7M-GTE coilpack I opted to go IS300 coils for basically the same price as just on stock coil. Along the way I also found someone had injectors 4 and 5 backwards. But still the misfire persisted. I had the ECU rebuilt by lscowboyls on Facebook, since my policy on a used car is Trust Nothing. But that didn't fix the misfire, though I didn't really expect it to. The igniter seemed fine so I left that alone...mostly because the only new/remanned replacement I could find was $800 through NAPA. Eventually my sights landed on the CPS, which had an absolutely horrifying splice job done on its wiring instead of just fixing the plugs like a normal human being:

20180213 CPS fuckered wiring.jpg

So after seeing this I figured the whole CPS itself was suspect, and thus I threw it at my cheap oscilloscope and was greeted by a lovely, enormously lopsided waveform, in addition to it being about half the strength it ought to. Bullets were bitten and triggers were pulled on a remanned CPS, and after spending that much I figured another $5 on Driftmotion's CPS magnet wouldn't hurt any further. Slapping all that together I found a much more agreeable waveform, and after installation along with splicing in a new receptacle on the harness I finally fixed the misifre!

Happy boosting ensued. lol yarite. Instead I was greeting with all of 4PSI, but at least the damned thing was driveable...until the very day I took it for emissions and then the fuel pump decided at that moment it was ready for retirement. On the damned rollers. A bit of coaxing managed to get it to live long enough to pass, and then I immediately needed a tow back home. Which is the point I've been at since.

Current plans for the current issue are to get a mk4 TT fuel pump, a replacement gas tank because this one has a corner caved in, and because I am paranoid to no end I will be resealing the tank before it goes in. As well I'll be putting in a healthier CT26 and the fleabay CXracing elbow; which I had the gasket surfaced machined flat already. The compressor wheel on the current turbo is chipped more badly than a bag of Doritos and has enough shaft play it could sign on at a porn studio.

This 'build' thread isn't going to be terribly exciting for a long while to come, but it's been a wild enough adventure I figure it's worth documenting at least
 

plaaya69

87T Supra
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#2
Glad to hear you are getting it up and running. You might want to go with a open mouth 1 piece downpipe like this style:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/86-92-Toyo...=item25a46bd23e:g:LN0AAOSwcwhVLIs-:rk:27:pf:0

instead of just a turbo elbow because you will notice way more pickup and a better exhaust/turbo sound (I have owned both in the past on the factory ct26). One of my favorite mods on my factory ct26 turbo was shimming the wastegate for a tab bit more power but I would only do that once you know the motor/turbo is healthy and running good.
 

3p141592654

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#3
Nice riead, I enjoy your writing style. Most likely your BOV (if it is stock ) is open all the time. This is a common failure and will do wonders for keeping your boost low.
 

suprarx7nut

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#4
Funny read. sounds like an adventure! I'm very near Longmont in case you need anything I can help out with, though it sounds like you're well on your way.

Good luck!
 

Kamikaizen

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#5
Surprisingly the stock BOV works! At the least it doesn't appear to be leaking when I tested it anyway, but I might just give myself some peace of mind and throw a Bosch recirculated valve on there in the near future. One small correction I did do is replace the check valve for the IAC. For reasons utterly beyond my comprehension that was removed at some point in the past. My eventual plans will be a full exhaust with a real downpipe instead of this autoerotic asphyxiation tube Toyota bequeathed this thing at birth, but that involves funds I won't have for a while to come. So this will be an incremental improvement.

And today also revealed something that now amazes me the turbo still worked at all:
20190112 turbo oil pipe clogged.jpg

Whoever monkeyed with the turbo last thought that using the stock gaskets were a good idea. So a GREAT idea is to RTV them in place! Right? ...right?? *headdesk* Farging icehole choked off the oil feed to a third of what it should be and I'm lucky a chunk didn't get swallowed...at least I hope there wasn't. At least they were consistent enough to do the exact same on the block side, so I got that going for me.

So on the docket now comes a softline kit because fffff, I knew the stock pipe was a bitch but mein gott that was more hassle than I wanted. Along the way I also discovered that the wires to one of the aircon pressure switches that run along here had its wires snapped off. And considering me and warm temperatures are not on speaking terms I would really rather have working a/c this summer, thus moar parts get thrown on the list for this beast hungers.

@suprarx7nut Thanks! I've actually been watching your Youtube videos. They've been quite helpful!
 

supraguy@aol

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#6
Nice work so far. And I appreciate the Johnny dangerously and Caddyshack references in your writing prose.
Hopefully, the farging bastage that owned your car before you, didn’t lay any additional traps along your path to automotive nirvana.
 

Kamikaizen

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#7
OKay so, fair bit of time passed and not much of an update. But, after I yanked the turbo previously I found the wires to one of my aircon switches was snapped off at the top of what looked like the switch body. Luckily both are still available from Toyota so I snagged fresh units, because why not? This is the best time to tackle them!

aircon switch plug repair.jpg
First up, wires were snapped at the very top of that dust boot, leaving basically nothing to work with. So after a tough time digging out those bastardly copper spade connectors and watching them ablate at every touch I crimped some new ones onto fresh copper and put them back in their rightful place. This time I put a little extra wire length under the boot as shown so there's a little bit of flexibility.

aircon switches installed.jpg
Then once the connectors was soldered in place - don't worry, I used a 5% silver solder that is vibration tolerant so I don't expect those to break any time soon - it was time to put them back into their rightful place in the engine bay. A quick splash of R-12 refrigerant oil on the o-rings and we're back in business...almost. The system still doesn't hold vacuum so eventually I'll muck about replacing the remaining o-rings and receiver/dryer, but today is not that day.

The turbo side of things is pending acquisition of an oil soft line kit. Still making a decision on which one to pull the trigger, but hopefully it won't be too much longer until our regularly scheduled happy boosting recommences.
 

plaaya69

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#8
Those new switches look nice. Do you plan on recharging the a/c with r12? I see some locally for sale and I remember the r12 freon worked so much better in my old 87 non turbo then when it was converted to r134a.
 

Kamikaizen

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#9
Well...less of an update than I wanted, and far later than I'd've preferred. Long story short: I buggered the crap out of my wrist somehow, ECU tendon slipped free and I had to be put in a cast for a month, and now I am in physical therapy trying to get my range of movement back. It's been an utter hell, but recently I've been able to (carefully) do some more work on the two ton terrible terror.

First thing's first: Coolant sensors? All...five of the suckers got the out-with-the-old treatment. Why? Because these things were built when there was still a space shuttle Challenger, that's why. Plus the corrosion on the originals was an unholy sight:
coolant sensors new2.jpg

And so with that out of the way - and undoing a previous owner's RTV job on the thermostat housing - I moved on to address the turbo problem. As mentioned before the compressor wheel is cracked something fierce and I want nothing to do with taking a risk of it grenading and worsening an already tired 7M. And so I had one sitting around I got from a Craigslist partout. The wheels are beautiful, shaft play is virtually nonexistent, so I'mma ship it.

Slight problem though: The water pipe's flange doesn't sit flush on this turbo for some reason. Both surfaces look decently flat. But I took some time to wire wheel them both in case there was any leftover gasket crap in the way. Which there was! ...the removal of which also changed nothing. So, slightly against my preferred desires I went ahead and put the water lines of my Mambatek hose kit on as well as the oil lines. Say what you will about not shopping at a tried and true brand name, but for the price this kit does seem to be fairly well made.

So, this is where I annoy everyone with pictures of Taiwanese hardware :>
Block side oil drain fitting: Pretty thick aluminum and the surface was nice and flat
oil hose barb block side.jpg

Turbo-side oil fittings and hoses. The drain is a rubber hose while the pressure line is braided stainless. And yes, the observant may notice a constant tension hose clamp. I'm taking no chances, and these are cheap insurance so why not?
turbo oil hoses mamba.jpg

And here's a view of the drain hose and its route to the block side barb. I managed to get the barb at an angle to where it isn't right up against the turbo hot side flange, nor over so far as to have a level spot in the routing. The supplied hose was double the length needed, so there's enough to test fitment with.
turbo oil drain hose mamba.jpg

A view of the pressure line banjo. The pressure line was pretty long so I routed it underneath everything and ran it behind the oil filter mount, which worked out nicely:
turbo oil pressure hose block side mamba.jpg

And you'll notice I reused the original banjo because... *drumroll*:
oil banjo bolt comparo 2.jpg oil banjo bolt comparo 1.jpg
The channels on the supplied banjo bolt are just a wee bit smaller. So, I went with the OEM one to avoid any possibility of failing to deliver enough oil to the CHRA.

Now, the fact of a rubber drain hose bothered me a bit. Namely because of heat and how much exhaust side stuff it'll be very near to. So to ice this cake I got me some Thermotec velcro'd heat wrap and loosely wrapped the whole section. Seriously, I love Cheap Insurance improvements. The little stuff that provides purified peace of mind but also isn't just going open-door-insert-monies:
turbo oil lines heat wrapped.jpg

So...not glamorous, but it's been needing to be done. And with that I moved on to other issues. The next one being the left brake lights; tail light circuit works just fine. But hit the brakes and one bulb shuts off entirely and the other will either go full bore, or just run the brake filament by itself. After making sure there were no issues upstream - even the fail box has successfully failed to fail! - it had to be the bulb holder itself. Thankfully it ultimately came down to corroded ground terminals. A little wire wheeling and we were back in action.


...


...except the bloody fuel pump.

This is my present albatross and the reason this beast hasn't moved since getting smogged. I have confirmed the pump actually works by hooking it up to independent power. Doing that the car will start and idle. Wants to stall with any throttle unless I'm careful but I'll worry about that later. I've also bypassed the fuel pump relay on the off chance that it shat the bed. Unfortunately for me the relay and resister's bowels appear to be intact after all. This led me to think back on the tail light dilemma, so I first checked continuity of the ground strap for the pump...reported back okay and with no abnormal resistance. So as a sanity check I attacked the pump's ground point and bolt with my dremel anyway...and man was it needed. The thing was practically caked in corrosion...the removal of which changed precisely 0.00 fuckalls.

So between my wrist starting to click again and my tweaked shoulder threatening secession I had to stop for the day. While I have a Denso TT fuel pump and a much nicer gas tank waiting to install, I know this pump still works and want to figure out this problem before putting the upgrades in place and still having this issue drive me bugnuts. Hopefully my next update won't take so long! (hah, this damned machine clearly has it out for me)
 

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Kamikaizen

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#10
All right! An update, fuck yeah!

Anyways. Long story short, that fuel pump was le toast. I suspected it was going out, and after comparing resistance of it - a whopping 18.5ohm - against my new Denso TT pump at 1.3ohm pretty much confirmed it, since electrically everything upstream was behaving; circuit opening relay, fuel pump relay, etc etc. After all the fun of recapturing the fuel, which I wasn't expecting six gallons when the needle was below 1/4 full, and a few key flicks to prime the system again she finally stumbled back to life.

As part of the pump swap I also procured a good condition gas tank, since mine was given a Reduced Capacity mod and caved in badly on one corner. I'm just lucky it didn't hit the pump or float area...but it came awfully close. New gaskets all around and I even picked up one of the last remaining five, per my dealer, fuel cutoff valves left and threw that in. It likely wasn't needed but y'know, I don't want to have to drop a fuel tank a second time. I even went so far as to pickup a tank sealing kit in case it had pinholes. I gave it the wash and rise phase, but after noting no leaks at all I opted to forgo the urethane coating.

Apple cider.jpg
Forbidden apple cider anyone? :D

And while I was at it, I decided to clean up the wiring to the ISCV. After peeling away the ancient electrical tape I was horrified by the sight before me:
ISCV old wiring.jpg

Almost every wire was previously spliced...TWICE. What the shitlicking christ. To make it even better, one terminal was just plain gone; it had bare stranded copper just kind of jammed into the connector. And bonus; two of the wires were freaking backwards. Small wonder I had so much idling difficulty before. So, brand new plug with fresh copper went on. I even used a rubber boot for the connector I had laying around because why the fark not:

ISCV new connector.jpg

ISCV wiring repaired.jpg

Yeah it's a bit longer than needed, but it doesn't interfere with anything and for now I am still in Removing Previous Owner Mods phase. Much as I want to dive into juicy modding and making this machine my own, I can't in good conscience do that while the wiring is so horrendously basketcased and the motor I know is a bit on the tired side. So for now I continue with repairs as necessary, and upgrades along the way when available, like replacing the original starter high tension lead with new 2awg. The original cable was stiff and crispy, so even if it ohmed out well I didn't feel like investing trust into a cable that was made when Mark Zuckerberg wasn't even in kindergarten yet.

Only problem now: in my fatigued state of mind I idiotically put the throttle body gasket upside down, so it's now hissing worse than Snakes On a Plane and prefers to idle at 1500 instead of a more civilized 650, but I'm just going to replace that gasket anyway since it's been heavily compressed by now.
 

xCxHxRxIxSx

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#11
Great thread! I'm enjoying following your progress on bringing her back to life. Keep up the good work, and hopefully she doesn't have too many more surprises in store for you lol
 

Kamikaizen

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#13
This is a small update, but one that's been needed especially since Colorado has evidently been in its monsoon season lately.

Long story short, the driver window regulator is shot to shit. The glass doesn't go all the way up, nor does it stay level, and the motor gear of course pops enough to get even Orville Redenbacher's attention. All of this leads to my getting the occasional unwanted, spontaneous douche if there's any significant rain. Thus! I get to deploy some more of my fresh parts hoard! Now, let's queue the music.

First up, the ungodly state of the original regulator. I knew there'd be a stripped gear and possibly slop in the tracks. But I did not expect the bloody track itself to be bent to the point where the roller nearly falls out:
window track bent.png

And for more previous owner goodness, they managed to - somehow - shear off one of the four mounting tabs for the motor side of the assembly. And I don't mean it was broken off while they were fucking around and just slapped it back in. I mean that tab was Still Bolted In Place:
window regulator broken fucking tab wtf.jpg

Luckily I had a much healthier assembly sitting around. But, I wasn't in a mood to trust another 31 year old motor, so I replaced it with a new VDO unit. I also used this opportunity to restore the pile on the felt window bumpers.

Before:
window bumper pile old.jpg

And after:
window bumper pile restored.jpg
...okay that's shittily out of focus but you get the idea. I'm no photographer. Sue me :p

Obligatory shot of the new assembly before it went in. I cleaned out and greased up all the tracks, gear path and hinge before putting this whole thing back together as I really am not interested in repairing the same thing twice.
window new regulator and motor.jpg

That's it that's all for right now. Eventually I'll do the same on the passenger door but it's not in nearly as bad shape. Next up will probably be replacing the diverter valve with a Kayser 710n or such since I'm beginning to think my lack of boost is at least partially to blame on that. But she starts and drives and boosts at least a little. :)
 

Kamikaizen

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#15
They're not new; I just spruced up the original ones by carefully using a brass detail brush to fluff the nap on them back up. I'm not sure if they're even still available from the dealer though I'm pretty certain the exterior trim with its two felt pads is NLA. YotaMD has a video on Youtube about restoring them which is where I admittedly got the idea from and it's made a dramatic improvement in the window rattle
 

Kamikaizen

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#16
Late morning motivation kicked in and I finally got around to a little mod I've been wanting for a long time.

It's pretty simple: Fan pattern windshield sprayers! Only problem; pre-89 hood means pre-89 nozzle footprint. So to tackle that I cut out a section of my RAV4's old hood to use for a cutting pattern:
windshield sprayer cut pattern.jpg

And here's the upgrade. IIRC they're off an `05 Camry:
windshield fan sprayers.jpg

I also did have to open the hole on the hood reinforcement a little since these have an angled hose barb. But that was fairly trivial in and of itself. And to finish off this mini update, a quick test of the new sprayers :)
windshield sprayer test.jpg