Rear subframe bushing and suspension bushing project.

MoparMarq

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Figured I'd start a new thread with just pics from this project after giving Randy at BIC proper acknowledgement for shipping the reinforcement parts so quickly. Painted bare parts of subframe and installed new SuperPro subframe bushings. As many have said in other threads, getting the old subframe bushings out was not too much of a task. Probably could have used a simple 3-jaw puller with long claws for enough reach over subframe. As it was, I had a OTC Hub Grappler tool kit that I needed for an Acura repair. Used the heavy duty 2 jaw spread bar to apply downward pressure on the bushing and basically tapped each out with hammer and 1/2" drive socket extension. Easy peasy.
Getting the new bushings in without damaging the flanges on the sleeves was going to be a trick, though. Luckily, the Hub Grappler tool kit had a selection of different collars/sleeves. One of the collars was a perfect fit over the bottom end of the bushing, fit snugly over the polyurethane and pressed on the sleeve flange close to or right along the sleeve shaft.
I realize most folks won't have access to the Hub Grappler tool kit or want to buy one. But it looks like the part number for the front and rear hub bearings for the MkIII and MkIV are the same. And the tool kit has instructions for replacing front and rear hub bearings on MkIV Supras, so perhaps it will work for MkIIIs also. Haven't replaced the rear bearings, as they are quiet, so can't say for sure. But one of the fronts is suspect. That project is in the future though.
Anyway, it doesn't look like the OTC Hub Grappler parts are available individually, but if someone figures out a way to get them individually, here are the part numbers:
Threaded rod/"forcing screw" (as described in manual) #555656
Lower cap #311884
Lower collar #311882
Upper cap #557520
Upper collar #557210
Pulling/forcing nut #311881

More pics shortly, as work (slowly) progresses...
 

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MoparMarq

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Pic in previous post shows bushing installed at completion of pull into place. Lower cap and collar up against bottom sleeve flange. Upper collar larger diameter resting on subframe outboard of bushing bore. Collar needed as bushing is taller than subframe depth. Pic below shows all bushings installed. With this tool kit, bushings must be installed without inner sleeves. Then after pressed into place, inner sleeves can easily be inserted by hand.
 

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MoparMarq

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Upper cap with forcing nut. As can be seen here, the upper cap needs an extension collar to bring the bushing up high enough so the flange on the bottom comes into contact with the subframe. Unfortunately, the forcing screw is not long enough to provide length for a collar on the top, and a collar on the bottom until the bushing is pulled into the subframe far enough to allow sufficient forcing screw threads above for forcing nut engagement.
 

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MoparMarq

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So the bushing is pulled in far enough with bottom cap and collar, top cap only, until the top of the bushing is just short of flush with the top of the subframe. How much is that? About 3/4" of an inch sleeve of bushing still exposed on the underside. Once the bushing is in that far, there is enough forcing screw above now to add the top collar under the top cap, engage the forcing nut with enough threads, and pull the bushing the rest of the way in.
 

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MoparMarq

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After install is complete. Here you can see that the upper collar and cap are a larger diameter than the lower cap and collar to allow for unimpeded protrusion of upper part of bushing.
 

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Enraged

A HG job took HOW long??
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Nice work!

I saw a tip awhile ago about subframe bushings. You use a torch to heat up the subframe, and it usually expands just enough to pop the old bushings out with a few hammer blows. Might work for install too.
 

Asterix

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For sliming polyurethane bushings before smooshing into place, I use silicone grease. You can find it called "dielectric grease" at your local parts store. It's way better than Sil-Glyde ever was.
 

MoparMarq

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I used regular grease on the inside bore of the bushing receiver on the subframe before installing, as it was metal-sleeve-to-steel-subframe contact and wouldn't move (in theory) after the install. Also stuck each bushing in the freezer the night before to shrink it slightly. With puller tool, it took about 40-50 ft-lbs of torque on each crank to pull it into place. Torque wrench was set on 70 ft-lbs and never clicked until bushing bottomed.
 

MoparMarq

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I apologize that I should have taken pictures as the work was progressing. I'm using the wife's camera to get the pics, and she'd be none too happy about getting a filthy camera back. Plus, the work has been slow due to life (wife, kids, house, mother's house, sister's house, sisters' cars, etc.) so I'm guessing most of you can relate.

That said, since I have another POS to drive while this is going on, I set a goal of "a bushing a day" to make it not too overwhelming. First off, this can be done by anyone without special tools except for one. And it may be possible to do it without that tool, but I was able to use it on every single bushing on the rear suspension. It's a American Muscle Mopar bushing remover/installer tool. I've had it for years after doing some Mopar projects, so I can't remember when or where I got it. But I see that it is listed at Mancini Racing website (although out of stock) as the Mancini Upper Control Arm Bushing Remover/Installer. You may have to buy the whole suspension tool kit, which would be a bummer. Or you may be able to make your own using some 1/2" threaded rod, nuts and washers, and a very large homemade receiver cup like a large deep-well socket. If you do so, make sure the threaded rod is large enough for strength, but small enough to fit through a 1/2" drive socket. IMG_4456.JPG

The pic above is, of course as labelled, the #1 Lower Suspension Arm (as described in the FSM) inner bushing after removal. Used a 1-1/8" 1/2" drive Snap-On socket as a driver, as it had the largest OD that would fit in the bore without getting jammed in the bore as it was driving the bushing out. This bushing came out clean, as did the same bushing on the other side of the car. Both cam bolts also came out clean. Used the next size up socket, IIRC, to drive the new bushing into the control arm bore. So far, so good.
 
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MoparMarq

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And by "a bushing a day", I mean remove an old bushing one day, install the new the next day. No point getting too ambitious.
The nice thing about doing the bushings this way is, the subframe doesn't have to be out of the car. And if the car is your driver, you can do a bushing or two one weekend, the tackle the next one(s) the following weekend (if you don't mind driving a possibly mis-aligned rear end car temporarily).
The next one is the #2 Lower Suspension Arm. The cam bolt on the right side came out clean(ish). The cam bolt on the left side was rusted solid to the inner sleeve on the bushing. No amount of torque was breaking it loose. And banging on the end of the bolt to break it loose was starting to bend the mounting ears on the subframe. The solution was inelegant, but it worked. Fortunately there is enough clearance between the control arm and subframe mounting ears to get the cutoff wheel of an angle grinder in between to cut the cam bolt. Once the cam bolt was cut, the head dropped out, and there is enough flex in the subframe to pull the control arm out while "rotating" it, if you will, about the threaded end of the cam bolt still stuck in the bushing. Probably could have used the angle grinder cutoff wheel to cut the other end of the cam bolt also, but the clearance is tight, and didn't want to booger up the control arm or subframe mounting ears in the process. IMG_4463.JPG

You can see the inner sleeve of the bushing still solidly rusted to what's left of the cam bolt, and the outer sleeve completely torn from the inner sleeve in the process of trying to loosen the cam bolt. Thank God DM and Toyota still sell new cam bolts!

IMG_4464.JPG
 

MoparMarq

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Next up, the Strut Rod. I don't know why, but neither the left or right strut rod would give up their bushings easily. Perhaps the OEM bushings for the strut rods have thinner sleeves than the inner bushings on the two lateral arms, so a socket couldn't really get a good "grip", so to speak on the sleeve. But neither bushing wanted to give up, even after liberally spraying each side with PB Blaster daily and letting it soak in for 3 days. The solution was to simply press the inner sleeve of the bushing out of the rod bore. Then, use a hack saw with the blade through the bore to cut the bushing outer sleeve down to (but hopefully, not THROUGH or INTO) the strut rod bore. That was task in itself. Used a hand hack saw as power tool would cut too fast. And it was quite difficult, nee impossible, to tell when the blade was through the sleeve and into the rod. So cut for a while, and then use a chisel or punch to separate the sleeve from the bore. Let's just say that the progress slowed down to less than "a bushing a day". IMG_4465.JPG

The left side is shown. It required two cuts to weaken it enough to be driven out. The right side gave up a little easier. Only one cut and a few punches with the chisel, then could be driven out.
 

MoparMarq

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Next up was the "Upper Arm". With the subframe out of the car, access was obviously easy. Didn't use a pickle fork on the ball joint end, obviously, as the control arms are made of unobtanium now. Used a puller to apply continuous force on the end of the threads to force ball joint out of knuckle (with the nut still on, but loosed two or three turns). Then a couple of good whacks on the knuckle itself where the ball joint stud goes through, and voila. The bolts holding the arm to the subframe were a no-drama deal. Once the arm is out of the subframe, the bushings in the arm have inner sleeves and "outer" sleeves, but the outer sleeves are located midway through the rubber. So the rubber is what is pressed into the arm bore. The outer sleeves have flanges that prevent the bushing from being pressed all the way through, but also prevent the "receiver" cup of the puller tool from getting a purchase on the lip of the control arm bore. So the flanges had to be cut off. Used a cutof wheel on the angle grinder. Had to be careful though, as cutting too deep would end up cutting into the bore of the control arm itself. Plus, cutting the flange means necessarily cutting the rubber also. What a pleasant aroma! Wife wasn't happy about that, either. IMG_4461.JPG

At least the inner sleeves weren't rusted to the bolts. That's something...

IMG_4462.JPG

They fit nicely in the receiver cup while being pulled out.

IMG_4460.JPG
 

3p141592654

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Brings back fond memories.... not! :D

 

Piratetip

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Been there.
I had to cut all of my control arm Cam bolts.
Every single one siezed solid to the bushing.

Not fun.
 

MoparMarq

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Next up was the knuckle end of the Strut Rod and #2 Lower Suspension Arm. The Strut Rod has a normal bushing on it, the part number of which I detailed in another post, and is still available from Toyota. Same technique for pressing that bushing out and pressing the new bushing in. Both left and right sides went out and in without much drama.
IMG_4468.JPG
 

MoparMarq

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Last up. The spherical bushing at the knuckle end of the #2 Lower Suspension Arm. Press out was no drama. That bushing has grease containment/dust exclusion boots on it that will get boogered up on pressing it out. No big deal. Pressing in the new one could "possibly" be done by applying the force on the center sleeve so as not to booger up the dust boot. Not sure the bushing is designed to take that kind of force, since most of the force while it is on the car is radial to bushing axis, not axial along axis. So I opted to remove the boot, press in the bushing using a socket that applied the force around the outer sleeve, then replace the boot and its retaining spring. IMG_4466.JPG

The picture shows how I "would" have removed the old bushing, but this is the new one already installed.
 

MoparMarq

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Judging by the comments and previous threads on this, I'm probably the last guy on the forum to get this done on the car, but there might a few who are contemplating it. It wasn't a pleasant job, but it wasn't impossible, either. I could have used my impact driver to speed things up also, but I avoided that to preclude the possibility of pulling a socket into a bore and never being able to ever get it out.
A little of the progress toward a finished product...

I hope I never have to use the zerk fittings, as I slathered up everything with the supplied silicone grease before assembly. But I saw that (I believe) PirateTip installed some when he did the work, so while they were out, it was easy to add the fittings in.

Some parts look loose. Nothings torqued down, yet.

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MoparMarq

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Been there.
I had to cut all of my control arm Cam bolts.
Every single one siezed solid to the bushing.

Not fun.
Please tell me that you noticed a difference in how the car drove and handled after you installed the new stuff?
I've had a "clunk" in the rear when going straight over non-trivial bumps and in left turns when going over almost any bumps. I suspect that the #2 lower suspension arm inner bushing was the culprit. Additionally, the car felt a little "unsettled", for lack of a better word, when going through curves.
 

MoparMarq

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I thought maybe that replacing the spherical bushings was overkill, as they "looked okay". Glad I replaced 'em. The grease was solidified, chunky, and there wasn't much left. IMG_4478.JPG

After thoroughly cleaning 'em with soft bristle brush and brake cleaner, the inner sleeves spun freely inside the outer sleeves. And there was at least .050" of end play in each bushing.

IMG_4479.JPG

So now I have a couple more desk adornments!