New AR15

Dunckel

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#1
I just purchased my first AR15. It's a Del-Ton DTI15. I honestly don't know much about AR15's, especially when it comes to things like M4/203 barrels or direct gas impingement. Wondering if anyone can take a look at the link and let me know what your opinion on it is. Mine is a bit different than the one pictured. I've got a flat top with picatinny rail, and a quad rail picatinny handguard. Other than that, identical.

http://www.gunsandammo.com/reviews/del-ton-dti-15-review/
 

Nick M

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#2
You don't need a mil spec barrel if you are not shooting mil spec ammo ( XM855) you see on the shelves. I would not buy a 5.56/.223 caliber, but that ammo is available in much larger quantities than almost all other AR calibers put together. So that is a positive for that caliber.

Many features mentioned are standard fare.
 

suprarx7nut

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#3
As someone relatively new to shooting I'd say focus on the basics and just get used to the thing. People get all crazy about the ar-15 and mods and this vs this and its all just extraneous.

For me the enjoyment and function of an ar is the shooting itself. Focus on range time and technique and such.

You're better off being good with the gun in your hands than you are being book savvy on them and the current trends.

My .02.

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
 

Dunckel

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#4
I'm a very experienced shooter. Usually a couple thousand rounds each year per gun. I'm very familiar with the AR-15, but I've never owned one. The only time I shoot one is to qualify, which I am consistantly in the 90% range for the police department. Usually though, I just grab one off the rack. Was just wondering if this brand would be a good starter rifle. Or if anyone has personal experience with the brand, or list some pros and cons with some of it's listed features. This is just going to be a "fun gun". Something to go target practicing with.
 

supranewbie

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#5
Good, reliable, accurate AR. Only con for me is the pistol grip. I like the original AR style grip. But then again, my hands are almost small. I think you're going to love it... Nick, out of curiosity and the value of your opinion, what do you dislike about the 5.56/223? You don't have to shoot 5.56 through it, it just gives you that option. Or is it just a preference for the superior knock down power of the .308?
 

Nick M

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#6
Nick, out of curiosity and the value of your opinion, what do you dislike about the 5.56/223?
mass x velocity = momentum

Out of the shorter barrels, the 5.56 loses too much speed to be effective on a consistent basis.

http://demigodllc.com/articles/6.8-mm-spc-cartridge-history-development-hornady-stag-arms-carbine/

Derivative wildcats from 5.56mm to up 7.62mm diameter shooting bullets from 90 to 140 grains were subjected to a battery of tests, and a sweet spot emerged. The 6.5mm bullets showed the best accuracy and the 7mm bullets were the most destructive, but the 0.277-inch bullets showed almost the same accuracy and trajectory as the 6.5mm and almost the terminal performance of the 7mm. When necked down to 0.277-inch and shooting 115-grain bullets, it provided the best combination of combat accuracy, reliability and terminal performance for up to 500 meter engagements. This cartridge was deemed 6.8 Remington Special Purpose Cartridge (SPC), because 0.277 inch is 6.8mm in metric and .30 Remington provided the parent case.


It does not have to be the opposite ends of the spectrum. You can use an intermediate cartridge.

Here is another decent report on intermediates.
 

Nick M

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#7
Was just wondering if this brand would be a good starter rifle. Or if anyone has personal experience with the brand, or list some pros and cons with some of it's listed features. This is just going to be a "fun gun". Something to go target practicing with.
When I ordered mine in 2009, they said 6 months and they meant it. That was after Soetoro's election. :biglaugh: Now, they have said things like indefinite back order. And ammo is also quite scarce, but not so much with 5.56.

RRA1.jpg

RRA2.jpg

RRA3.jpg

RRA4.jpg

RRA5.jpg

RRA6.jpg

RRA7.jpg

This barrel is from the 270W round, which is what the 6.8 is. There are better barrels, but this is durable and affordable. So is Wilson Combat, only you lose the affordable part with the low pressure/restriction barrels.
 

supranewbie

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#9
Have a beautiful FN SCAR 17 in .308 and the Stag Arms Model 5L in 6.8. Very happy with both. That said, I shoot with guys who shoot 5.56/.223 through various brands of weapon. They all love them. And when it's time to buy ammo, I can see why. The complaints come from the guys who bought the smaller chambered .223.
These arms, in any of the aforementioned calibers, shoot plenty flat enough for most shooters. And have enough poop to get the job done if your abilities allow them to. Not that every caliber doesn't have it's place.
The best way to choose a weapon, in my own opinion, is to do some window shopping. Pick them up, pull them into position and then check your sights. The one that comes most naturally to bear and is the most comfortable to you is generally going to be the most accurate. For you. The gun is only as accurate as it's operator. If you're comfortable with it and it comes from a reputable manufacturer, buy it.
My buddy's Del-Ton makes him grin every time we shoot together. I believe that's what you're looking for, OP?

My $.02 worth.

Happy Hunting!
 

Dunckel

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#10
That works for me. I understand this isn't a top end gun, but the price was right at $500 cash, brand new, with two 30rd mags included. A friend of mine is a collector. He was selling 17 of his AR15's.
 

Nick M

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#14
$500 for an AR is awesome. Well done, man.
Colt has nowhere near that much invested in the plastic and aluminum. The Army paid $550 USD for select fire A2 rifles prior to 9-11. I don't know what the M4 costs in Fed Log anymore.
 

supranewbie

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#15
Colt has nowhere near that much invested in the plastic and aluminum. The Army paid $550 USD for select fire A2 rifles prior to 9-11. I don't know what the M4 costs in Fed Log anymore.
I guess if Dunckel bought a couple million units, maybe $500 wouldn't be such a good deal for that particular rifle.
 

Nick M

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#16
I guess if Dunckel bought a couple million units, maybe $500 wouldn't be such a good deal for that particular rifle.
The amount of units is irrelevant. By market forces, which is what should control prices, he did ok. My point stands that there is a lot of margin in the AR-15 variants, because the market will bear it.
 

supranewbie

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#17
Number of units, in regard to what you have to pay, is almost always relevant, no matter what you're buying. I'm trying to figure out why you seem to be trying to argue. I think there are two completely separate topics here. Whether the OP made a good purchase and whether we agree with Capitalism. And I'm pretty confident that we agree on both counts.
I must have misunderstood post #14. It sounded like you were saying $500 is too much to pay for an AR because the US Military was able to purchase Colt A2s for $550 per. I guess I'm a little simple minded perhaps, because I missed what you say was your point. The market will definitely bear a wide margin.

Sorry about the tangent, Dunckel ;)
 
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Nick M

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#19
It sounded like you were saying $500 is too much to pay for an AR because the US Military was able to purchase Colt A2s for $550 per.
That is what I said. There is a lot of margin in the rifle. Because the market will bear it. I was just looking at a local shop, and to me it is a clown show with straight face. 800-1300.
 

Nick M

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#21
I now have 2 M4 variants in 6.8 x 43. Technically, it is a CAR-15 variant. Unfortunately, I do not have a mill.