My long-running Supra build thread

debrucer

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Hi, I wrote this first post in someone else's thread and posted before I thought it through. Mostly we try not to do that :(

I had a build thread years ago, and have some static information on the web, but, SupraMania is where I've always landed for info, so let me use this post to drive a stake in the ground. Here's where my '88 is today, as originally posted in response to a topic in someone else's thread....

I am using a T60-1 Turbonetric, HKS down pipe, new stock cat, then the Blitz Nur cat-back. Car long time in the assembly stage, but progress being made. It's been SMOG'ged and I've given away the original stock exhaust... in a tight garage, getting ride of every bit of clutter is progress. The engine and trans are on a mobile stand that I welded, and currently working on other welding projects, getting ready for the actual required job on the Supra. Progress today on the visible stuff, the Supra emblem is finally attached and the nose is bolted back on for the first time in over ten years :)

IMG_1203.jpg


Because it's not the OEM bumper cover the original hardware wasn't usable to attach the nose without some customization. It's secured with 19 bolts and nuts, which is at least twice as many as the entire bumper cover. A local buddy gave me the discontinued Supra emblem badge clip, and with that, everything fell into place.

I've got the original lamps and brackets, and I may put them in temporarily just to complete a look, but, I have some special lamps in mind, and the plan is to build aluminum boxes for them. A new OEM undercover loses attachment points too, leaving the front flapping in the wind, so it gets' cut off. A new undercover will be made and it fits right into the slot around the bumper cover's lip.

The engine sits, waiting for me to finish the valve lash shim dance...


IMG_1243.JPG


Space is so tight, but at least the car is movable these days.. off the stands... exhaust is currently inside the car, as is the turbo and a bunch of other stuff :) I spent a two-week vacation living at the shop this year, and think I have the logistics to master the space shortage figured out :)

I've listened to quite a few videos of Supra sounds, and yeah, I want it to sound good, but at this point, having done so many things over such a long period of time, the sounds I'm worried about now might come from some mistake I made any time over all these years....

If it doesn't knock of otherwise blow gas, I'm pretty sure it will sound fine :)

David
 
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debrucer

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This car was originally TEMS equipped, but the modules were missing on the front. The computer is in the right rear quarter panel and the wiring harness has the connections for front and rear TEMS modules. Illumina adjustable shocks are installed front and rear.

Recently I obtained a complete TEMS setup, front and rear with the computer, a switch and another module that I don't understand yet.

I've definitely got the Illumina shocks that work with TEMS. They've got the nipple, looks like a tire valve stem, in the center, and the TEMS motor fits right on.

But, there are no studs to secure it on the front.
front-shock-no-studs.JPG

They're are studs on the rear.
rear-shock-with-studs.JPG

Not sure how I got to this point without seeing, and the thought of re-doing the front suspension now makes me sick :(

There's still a lot of work to be done on getting the strut braces, front and rear, installed.

So, that's progress. The caps that came with the front units were red, so I scuffed them up and painted them. That was an appropriately sized piece that I could have powder coated, but I'm getting tired. Here's how they came out, and the general status of the under hood look. I am not taking everything off to paint. The underside of the carbon fiber hood is black, and the original under the hood color was black. Most of the underside of the car had undercoat removed and re-applied.

Even once I get the front shocks drilled and threaded to mount the TEMS, there's a lot of work to be done to install the shock tower support.

Here's a shot of test fit with newly painted black covers. Wires present and attached.
under-hood.JPG
This isn't the last time, of course, until the studs are in place. Without battery power to the car there is no way to set the shocks and TEMS motors to be properly synchronized. So, with that, and the shock tower support to be installed, this is not done by any means.

There's a lot of cutting and trimming going to be required to install the one in the rear, too. That, coupled with the specific sequence you have to remove and re-install the panels, is going to be a logistic PITA.

The harness bar mounts between the top OEM seat belt mounting point. A hole needs to be cut in the triangular shape panel that mounts across the quarter windows. It's cheating to make a slot to fit the panel. It needs to be a circle at the right place. There was a template at one point, but, I've lost it, and can't find anyone who has it.

That's the first interior panel to install. You work your way around until you get to the point where you can put the wooden floor back in, and then you finish the panel installation. It's hard enough just doing that. Now, super-impose cutting holes to mount the shock tower support, with the TEMS still operationally functional.

This is not fun. Sometimes it feels much closer than it actually is.... this is not one of those times... there's a lot of work to be done.
 
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sinistar_xx

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I noticed your TEMS covers seemed to be positioned "wrong" compared to how they're oriented on mine. That had me searching through my archive of pics for other MK3 Supras (BaT galleries are the best for this), and it seems mine are the ones in the wrong orientation. I had a feeling, because I recently swapped in some nicer ones, which I placed exactly the way the original was were placed, and I noticed the wiring wasn't long enough to hook into the retaining bracket. When I get a chance to fix the broken wiring on one of them, I will correct them. Although, in a way, it seems like the original position isn't ideal, as it exposes the wiring inward toward the engine and all its heat -- which is probably why the wiring on mine is so brittle at this point.

I'm curious if you went with upgraded '89+ TEMS actuators?
 
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debrucer

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I noticed your TEMS covers seemed to be positioned "wrong" compared to how they're oriented on mine. That had me searching through my archive of pics for other MK3 Supras (BaT galleries are the best for this), and it seems mine are the ones in the wrong orientation. I had a feeling, because I recently swapped in some nicer ones, which I placed exactly the way the original was were placed, and I noticed the wiring wasn't long enough to hook into the retaining bracket. When I get a chance to fix the broken wiring on one of them, I will correct them. Although, in a way, it seems like the original position isn't ideal, as it exposes the wiring inward toward the engine and all its heat -- which is probably why the wiring on mine is so brittle at this point.

I'm curious if you went with upgraded '89+ TEMS actuators?
The part numbers were right for my ‘88, so I believe not upgraded. The wires were prebent in the wrong direction so I switched the sides such that the wires were pre-bent to meet the clips. That’s interesting though. Glad I got it right :)
 

Feuerstoss

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Just saw your thread! Looks like you're making some progress. Kudos for making an effort at keeping TEMS; I was looking into it but decided to go a different route with my build.

Since I saw another recent-ish post from you in an exhaust thread, from what I've heard on YouTube the Nur-Spec should sound amazing. It was a pretty pricey one before it was discontinued; I think they were $700-800 or so? Here's a few sound clips(and an entire Nurburgring run with a 7MGE) that I've found:

(this might not be the Blitz, but I think it sounds pretty similar)
(the Ring run)
 

debrucer

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In 1975 I was one of two salesmen at the local Alfa, Ferrari, Triumph, Saab dealer in Annandale, Virginia.

I used to sit in the showroom and dream. One of my dreams was a TEMS-like system applied to my Alfetta GT.

My hobby was tinkering with an RCA game computer that used a 44-pin bus on the case to insert game cartridges. I reverse engineered that bus and spent the next six years building circuits with it, and a computer, before the Tandy TRS-80, that sprawled across my workbench.

Thinking back to what I dreamed of accomplishing, long ago lost along the way, was a suspension system that altered itself as you drive down the road.

I went on and had a family, pursued a career using technology, and never got around to my suspension system.

As with most things, somebody did them without me. In this case, Toyota did, 13 years later.

I want to see how well it does, thirty years later,
 
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debrucer

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Painting those caps on the TEMS was a waste of time since I can’t use them with the shock tower brace

CB25FD4A-1B91-4276-B3BA-35DA6F29C666.jpeg 6496D0AD-7F45-4F42-8A21-4AEDCF07638F.jpeg

I see now that my TMS harness bar was discontinued because it’s potentially dangerous. If I weld it in place it will never come out again. Oh well.

D6071896-6836-4C91-BB1E-4F146CD932B2.jpeg

Carpet is going in and it sure is hard to get it right. The four seat belt points under the front seats for attaching the anti-submarine belts (6-point harness) are welded in... and I haven’t cut slots in the carpet correctly yet. The belts each have 5 adjustment points to handle drivers from 5’9” to 6’ 2”. Those belts need to be 90 degrees from the floor and tilted back no more than 10.

I also need to route the battery and stereo cables before tucking in the carpet to the door panels. This will include some fabrication to mount the amplified and battery (which are both where the rear seats used to be :)

I have templates for mounting two or three 7" touchscreens in the dash, but, as with the ECU, I will start with a stock cluster until I get it running. There's still a bit of work to do here... and on the engine front cover and cam. My crank has 12 and 36-1 trigger wheels, and the CPS is getting it's guts replaced. My plan is run first, and then switch in those two mods (electronic dash and Speeduino)

What else recently?

0EBF7477-5D28-4FC4-A2D8-06B700D220B7.jpeg

I was going to run on the stand and I think most people put the harness on the engine before installing.

I want to get it set in the car so I can switch to my Speeduino easily.

Mode later. Phone battery ran low and PC uploads need extra handling to shrink photo size. I'll upload more when the battery is back :)

Stay well. Stay safe!
 
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Piratetip

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Hey no engine under that hood yet!
:)

Those TEMS actuators are a very very tight fit under that strut bar.
 
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debrucer

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Hey no engine under that hood yet!
:)

Those TEMS actuators are a very very tight fit under that strut bar.
They are. Must loosen the bolts to slip them in... and it obviously has to come out for the engine to go back, but, I want to test fit them and now will fix the wires... get rid of what's there and put something sleek in place. Too bad that the fit isn't so tight that they don't need the missing attachments. I will have to fabricate something for that, too.

Clarification: They are not anchored to the struct since there are no studs to secure them to... right now they freely turn within the struck bracket.
 

debrucer

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I finally got back to my firewall pass-thru connectors for the battery relocation.

First picture of the pieces:
6BC86BB9-F250-47C7-A5D8-6D303937247F.jpeg

Second picture from inside the fender with the plastic wheel arch liner removed:
F9BB9F2E-DD2E-4DA4-B01D-4F4B3DC25C65.jpeg

Third picture from inside the car with the carpet pulled up:
BC7D63AF-023D-4120-9EBC-9322E8FF58EF.jpeg

It would be nice of me to edit these photo and show the similarities from each side, but I'm at the garage and getting ready to drill holes :) The orientation of photos two and three are different, confusing the solution even further.

Next shot from inner wheel arch:
54067446-7D9C-47DF-B038-122E5D504FBB.jpeg

FInal shot from inside the car:
02850996-C9C3-4259-A55A-71EC90CB2F92.jpeg

On another task...

I also test mounted the R154 transmission onto the engine to check the pilot bearing fit. It went well. Of course it has to come back off to mount the flywheel and clutch, but pilot bearing issue resolved. The DriftMotion bearing is fine, btw.

CF7BD63E-9C38-4F3B-A49E-892FD543FED0.jpeg

Feels like I did so much more, but those are today's accomplishments. Next time, maybe, battery cables :)

Cheers!
David
 
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CajunKenny

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It's kind of hard to tell in the picture for sure, but it looks like you're running a paper EGR Cooler Gasket. If so, save yourself some heartache and replace it with an OE one. The paper one's blow out.

Nice looking car you've got there btw!
 
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debrucer

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It's kind of hard to tell in the picture for sure, but it looks like you're running a paper EGR Cooler Gasket. If so, save yourself some heartache and replace it with an OE one. The paper one's blow out.

Nice looking car you've got there btw!
You're absolutely right. I do remember than it wasn't graphite or anything like that, and I did use the Toyota FIPG... must have been a paper gasket. At the time I was more concerned with 8 bolts that matched... I had seven. IIRC, the head-size on these was 2 mm smaller than what the hardware store sold. I've gone back and re-read the posts on the subject, and it looks like the authorities to believe say use only OEM. Order placed. Thanks. Oh, and thanks on the btw :)
 
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debrucer

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I finally got back to my firewall pass-thru connectors for the battery relocation.

First picture of the pieces:
View attachment 84478

Second picture from inside the fender with the plastic wheel arch liner removed:
View attachment 84480

Third picture from inside the car with the carpet pulled up:
View attachment 84479

It would be nice of me to edit these photo and show the similarities from each side, but I'm at the garage and getting ready to drill holes :) The orientation of photos two and three are different, confusing the solution even further.

Next shot from inner wheel arch:
View attachment 84481

FInal shot from inside the car:
View attachment 84482

On another task...

I also test mounted the R154 transmission onto the engine to check the pilot bearing fit. It went well. Of course it has to come back off to mount the flywheel and clutch, but pilot bearing issue resolved. The DriftMotion bearing is fine, btw.

View attachment 84483

Feels like I did so much more, but those are today's accomplishments. Next time, maybe, battery cables :)

Cheers!
David
My Supra battery (an Optima AGM Red Top) is mounted in an aluminum box in the right-rear, passenger position. The negative side has a SPST cutoff switch and the positive side has an ANL fuse immediately off the battery.

The ANL fuse should be a fusible link, not a fuse, and the size of such is not defined in amps but rather by size with the size (gauge) being numerically 4 larger, smaller wire. The OEM fusible link is located in the alternator circuit, but I'm putting it closer to the battery in the cabin. Since it is a fuse and not a fusible link, I don't know how to calculate the size accurately... either to a wire size, or amperage fuse rating.

Sir Google says that a typical 12 volt system carries 48 amps. The alternator circuit is 80 amps and that is pretty much the highest. Already the numbers conflict. I purchased 100, 150 and 300 amp replacement fuses and will deal with it.

Positive and negative 1/0 OFC copper cables are connected to the firewall pass-thru connectors. The negative is not grounded in the cabin.

From inside the left front wheel well the positive cable is routed to the fuse box, starter and alternator. The negative, ground cable is routed to the chassis and the block at the factory locations (10 mm bolt next to original battery location and 14 mm bolt on the block).

A separate fuse/junction box is located in the cabin for accessories. It is attached to the positive battery terminal and is grounded back to the negative terminal on the battery... therefore, using the original factory grounds under the hood for anything connected on the box in the cabin.


fuse-block.jpg
 
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3p141592654

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Is the ANL fuse inline with the starter cable? I'm a little confused with your description. A starter will have very large peak currents, much more than 80 amps.
 

debrucer

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Is the ANL fuse inline with the starter cable? I'm a little confused with your description. A starter will have very large peak currents, much more than 80 amps.
In an OEM installation the fusible link is in the alternator cable, but I have no original cables. With the battery relocation, the positive circuit needs the protection closer to the battery. It is customary for a fusible link to be within 18 inches of the battery, so that's what I'm trying to do, except with a fuse. The TSRM says the "specified current" for testing a starter is "90 amps or less at 11.5 volts". I bought two inline fuse blocks and an assortment of fuses (100, 150, and 300 amps). If it needs to be somewhere else, please explain why. I overthink these things to death... and hopefully get them right along the way :)
 
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debrucer

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It's kind of hard to tell in the picture for sure, but it looks like you're running a paper EGR Cooler Gasket. If so, save yourself some heartache and replace it with an OE one. The paper one's blow out.

Nice looking car you've got there btw!
DriftMotion to the rescue. Gasket installed. I had used a paper gasket with FIPG on the side closest to the head. While it was "paper", it was more like cardboard, but definitely not the material of the OEM. Glad I replaced it. Thanks again.
 

Piratetip

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The starter current draw peaks at around 700A with a sustained draw of around 300A.

90A is nowhere near enough.
 

Piratetip

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Correction: I am remembering amperage values of new cars I test in my lab.

I did some testing on the supra as well here:
Peak of 450A and sustained of around 160A.
This is only starter load, so does not include any lights / ecu / fuel injection system ECT...
Total vehicle amperage load will be higher during cranking.
 
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debrucer

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The starter current draw peaks at around 700A with a sustained draw of around 300A.

90A is nowhere near enough.
The alternator is fused at 80 amps. The starter is tested at 90 amps. I hear what you're saying, but don't see it. A properly sized fusible link would be my preference because it's based on the wire's capability, not the circuit's requirements. Provide the right sized wire and the fusible calculation is automatic. I'm not too far along to change things, but need to know why.
 

figgie

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Debrucer,

All fuses are there to protect the wire not the devices.

On the starter, believe piratetips numbers.

The magnetic solenoid itself pulls 30 amps sustained. This was from a NipponDenso 7MGTE starter rated at 1.2kw.

I use 1/0 awg wire to feed the motor section of the starter. 4 awg will warm up under the starter load
 
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debrucer

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Debrucer,

All fuses are there to protect the wire not the devices.

On the starter, believe piratetips numbers.

The magnetic solenoid itself pulls 30 amps sustained. This was from a NipponDenso 7MGTE starter rated at 1.2kw.

I use 1/0 awg wire to feed the motor section of the starter. 4 awg will warm up under the starter load
In the original battery cables there are no fuses and there is a fusible link in the alternator wire. based on the rated numbers alone, perhaps I should have gone with 4/0 wire. Even that size 4/0 (notably, not 4 AWG, but 4-ought) does not come close to @Piratetip 's numbers, and I'm quite confident 1/0 is sufficient for my purpose. I haven't seen a replacement fuse above 350, much less, 450.

A properly sized fusible link would resolve this if I could purchase based on the 1/0 sized wire it is needed for... it's not a particular amperage, it's a formula applied to determine size. The AWG numbers, mixed with the 1/2/3/4- ought. makes it seem rather incalculable in my little brain :(
 

Piratetip

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I don't follow what you are trying to do.

The feed to the starter usually has no fuse or fusable link. Just a single uninterrupted wire.
The starter relay does the work there.
You want to size the wire as to not limit the amperage or create excessive voltage drop when cranking. Give the starter everything it can take.

The only other highest amperage load in the system would be the alternator. Size that large fuse to protect the gauge and length of the + wire as to not overheat if pushed hard.

All the other electrical loads in the vehicle are not very exciting, pretty low amperages overall.
I think when running/idling my car draws around 15A only for all vehicle loads. (No lights/nothing extra on)

Are you retaining the original fuse box and wiring under hood and just running the + extension to the rear?
 
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debrucer

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I don't follow what you are trying to do.

The feed to the starter usually has no fuse or fusable link. Just a single uninterrupted wire.
The starter relay does the work there.
You want to size the wire as to not limit the amperage or create excessive voltage drop when cranking. Give the starter everything it can take.

The only other highest amperage load in the system would be the alternator. Size that large fuse to protect the gauge and length of the + wire as to not overheat if pushed hard.

All the other electrical loads in the vehicle are not very exciting, pretty low amperages overall.
I think when running/idling my car draws around 15A only for all vehicle loads. (No lights/nothing extra on)

Are you retaining the original fuse box and wiring under hood and just running the + extension to the rear?
Yes. Using the original fuse box under the hood. The cable to the alternator is where the OEM fusible link is located. Wiring under the hood is otherwise normal.

Since I’m not using OEM cables, but bulk wire, my alternator cable has no fusible link. My attempt to use a fuse is trying to protect the 1/0 wire and is placed as close to the battery as feasible.
 

Piratetip

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Why not just place a + junction box under hood where the + cabling would normally converge at the battery positive clamp/post.
Run your + cable from the rear to this location.
No significant under hood wiring changes would be needed then.
 

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I'd you want protection at the back next to the battery I would use a resettable circuit breaker.
It's primary function would be to protect against hard short circuits due to Breaks in insulation/wiring mistakes ECT...
Highest I see would be 300A, and they are rated for % over this in time and amperages.
Check the pdf for the chart indicating time vs. percent of rated current. There is also a temperature derating curve.
 
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3p141592654

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All above is correct. The 90A you refer to is the no load starter current draw. With the load of the engine the current draw skyrockets.

The current rating of cables is generally based on acceptable voltage drop over long lengths and heating (90C max) considerations when bundled in conduits. The actual destructive current draw is much higher than the number you quote. In automotive system the starter wire is normally unfused because it is considered a bigger liability to have the entire electrical system go down than is the liability of an overload causing a fire. The short circuit current of your battery is around 1000A. It falls off pretty fast though, I am sure Nick has plots. So the cable is just got to survive a short while with that high current.

Here is a typical standard (this is marine) for mobile electrical systems. Note the exception.

All circuits, except the main supply from the battery to the starter motor and electrically driven steering motors, should be provided with electrical protection against overload and short circuit, (i.e. fuses or circuit breakers should be installed).
 

Piratetip

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Yup sure do!
Sometimes we dead short a battery in the lab to see how long it lasts.
The cabling we use is massive, so the failure point is usually the lead posts melting into a puddle and loosing connection.
:cool:
 

debrucer

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The exception being the starter cable. I get it.

The fuse block used is directly off the positive battery terminal and is there to protect that long run through the cabin and firewall.

An OEM setup has a fusible link in the alternator circuit. Even if I had an OEM cable there (alternator) with an appropriately sized fusible link, it would not protect from the battery positive run from the cabin to the front. Hence, my attempt to protect that circuit. It does seem that whether a fuse or a circuit breaker, that the amperage required isn't a standard part (i.e., not commonly available in the amp range / package we expect to find available).

The marine standard document linked says "Electric cables should be constructed to a recognised (SIC) standard for marine use in small vessels." That leaves a lot of room for preference or discretion.

The math and logistics aren't computing here yet. Because of the long run from the battery, even if I had an OEM alternator cable with the fusible link, I would still want to fuse the B+ circuit. While I was preparing for 100-150 amps, thinking 300 was way high, I'm now told it needs to be 450, or if following a recognized standard, two times that value, or 900.

Yet, in the market place neither 450 or 900 is an available value. Seems to me that any resultant product would be as out-of-place as having used 4/0 runs :)

I appreciate all the info. I will deal with it taking into consideration higher amperage requirements than I had expected.

Searched again and found 500 amp replacement fuses. I will be getting a couple of those :)

Thank you again everyone.
 

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@debrucer

Are you daisy chaining the starter and alternator?

If you are not daisy chaining them, the starter won't need a fuse since it is normally open due to the unenergized solenoid.

If you are daisy chaining them, i can tell you that a 250 amp resettable circuit breaker will work with the stock 7mgte starter.
 
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debrucer

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@debrucer

Are you daisy chaining the starter and alternator?

If you are not daisy chaining them, the starter won't need a fuse since it is normally open due to the unenergized solenoid.

If you are daisy chaining them, i can tell you that a 250 amp resettable circuit breaker will work with the stock 7mgte starter.
The positive cable is routed to the fuse box, starter and alternator. This was researched as being the original setup. I can follow the connections in the TEWD individually, but the starting circuit and the charging circuit are separate diagrams. Without an engine, starter or alternator installed, the only physical piece that I can identify is the fuse box.

The factory routing is anticipated. Do you call that daisy chaining?

I fully agree from the start that the starter circuit does not require a fuse.

I have no plans to move from the ANL fuse block and some value of fuse to a circuit breaker. I will change to a fusible link if I can find the proper spec'ed wire, but I'm not going to change a circuit-breaker for a fuse now. I see no reason as long as an amperage needs to be specified.

250 amps gives me hope. Sounds to me like I'll be using 500. We'll see :)

Thanks again.
 

3p141592654

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Based on your concern, I would run two cables to the battery. One unfused starter cable 1/0, and the other lighter gauge that would be fused at the battery and go to the original fuse box. Shown below is the factory setup. The lighter gauge wire bolts to the battery clamp and runs directly to the fuse box as shown.

Image1.jpg
I had a fiat X1/9 that had the battery in the front and the engine in the back. The starter cable was unfused in that factory configuration.
 
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debrucer

It's about the journey
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The landlord of my commercial garage space gave me permission to park my car outside for three weeks. This has given me a great chance to do jobs that take more than a day... and cuts out at least an hour per day just getting ready to work. I will be spoiled to go back to the old way... best get this baby under the hood :)

Test fitting, final paint, etc., so the status of any individual item may change from shot to shot. There's hope yet. I am still fussing with the sensors and have settled on a dual wheel setup: 12-tooth primary, 36-1 secondary. Cherry hall effect sensors feel like the most reliable in my inventory.

Here are 14 pics taken over the last couple of weeks...


IMG_1764.JPG IMG_1772.JPG IMG_1761.JPG IMG_1768.JPG IMG_1778.JPG IMG_1779.JPG IMG_1781.JPG IMG_1836.JPG IMG_1837.JPG IMG_1838.JPG IMG_1846.JPG IMG_1851.JPG IMG_1856.JPG IMG_1770.JPG
 

debrucer

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Welding bungs on front pipe for wide-band O2 sensors. Specs say it should be 24 to 36" past the turbo, but also state a pretty narrow operating temperature range, so I put two bungs and will plug one, use one.

I had been holding my breath on valve shim / lash adjustment because when I tired to do this at least twice before, there was absolutely NO clearance. Originally I kept the values, cups and pucks together for each location... and that turned out not to help. It's been years since the valve work was done, but I feel like, maybe seem to remember, that the valve stems were not shortened to account for additional depth after surfacing the values and seats... (and or replacement values for a few). At any rate, I finally believed I had just pushed things so tight that I would lose the ability to compensate in the 43 puck range.

Today I removed the exhaust cam, made sure the pucks were lubricated and free... switched a couple around, and randomly put pucks back in... not caring about measuring them... just put them in. Re-lubed the cam caps, torqued to spec, rotated and checked each, and four were within range. So now, it's just musical pucks. It's doable, and I will. Can't wait to get back on it. So much going on :)

I had finished sand-blasting everything I could and had a chance to sell my cabinet... and did. I had also done quite a bit of powder coating, too, and have six colors if you count clear on the shelf. I figure I saved at least 12 hours with a rattle can, and wasted several hundred on powder coating equipment.

The fuel rail setup is missing a couple of copper washers, but it's far from where it needs to be. I haven't figure out the setup of that yet. I've got the pieces, and suspect DriftMotion will fill in what's missing. The injectors are installed for the first time, and that part of the engine is buttoned down pretty well. There are lots of nuts and they're torqued. Can wait to get that way on the timing pieces. Torqued!

The crankcase isn't leaking and I still need to fabricate a bracket for the dip stick.

I had purchased pieces to mod the CPS, and went with the 12-tooth crank wheel, so the CPS can be gone. Still, I may play with it a bit... one day.

When I welded the seatbelt brackets to the floor, I burned a hole through the single layer (of the floor) about the size of a quarter. Two subsequent attempts with the TIG and I made it worse. A novice TIG welder is bad enough, but trying to use a knee to operate a foot pedal while bent over to the floor, just does not work. I bought a hand-control for the torch and that fixed that, but, the patch panel didn't go in well... a case of me not cleaning the underside well enough. Another patch panel is in the works, and I will wait for my buddy in the next garage to put it in with a MIG welder.

I feel like I'm forgetting something, but that's it for now.

Stay well!
 
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