First test drive of the fresh rebuild is going down tomorrow...I have some issues and questions!

the t3d

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I am a tad worried and nervous to take her out on the road for the first time and seat these rings. I am very explanatory so this may look wordy, but I am trying to give you as much detail as possible. My main concerns are that it when I fired it up in August, she fired up and warmed up in the driveway, no overheating issues or major leaks, so I was very happy about that. However, it was reading pretty damn lean on my AFR gauge, which had me worried. I smoke-tested the motor beforehand and I saw not a damn puff of smoke. Felt great about that. Vacuum at idle was a little lower than I wanted, sitting about 14-15 inches. I know that number should rise a little once the rings are seated so I can at least drive it with those numbers and not worry about leak issues. I am using the SAFC2 to tune it and I have the Lexus AFM/Walbro fuel pump combo with the RC 550s, that were freshly cleaned and passed inspection. When I first built the car, I had vacuum/boost leaks that I wasn't aware of and was using the JT61GT turbo. For this build, I have a brand new slightly smaller, faster spooling turbo from Boost Lab. My SAFC2 was used to manipulate the vacuum leak I wasn't aware of, so I was adding fuel to bring the AFR numbers down. As I was fixing the leaks, I started dialing down the fuel addition and the car was running great before the headgasket gave up on maintaining coolant pressure. So now, the SAFC2 numbers are for the old build, and I want to just add fuel to get it to a proper AFR. The final WOT tune would be done on a dyno like last time, but for this initial test run, I don't need this thing leaning out on me. Fuel pressure is right on the money as well, vacuum line on and off, so I am hoping adding a little fuel to get my numbers proper is alright to do.

For taking the time to read all this, here is a couple pictures of Luna and her core...



Now, my major concern that is also related is what's driving me crazy the most. I read a lot about the process of breaking in the motor, with running it hard and changing the oil numerous times and all that. And what scares me is that the engine started smoking after letting it run in the driveway too long. To be honest, she only ran for like 10-15 minutes tops to make sure nothing was leaking and make my inspections. After reading about the issue of letting the car run too long and ruining the process of ring seating, I am starting to worry that I have ruined my motor by fucking up the break-in process. I really didn't let it run all that long when I think about it, and she has not been started since August. So my plan tomorrow is to start the car, let it warm up, quickly add some fuel with the SAFC2 to not have it run so lean, and then take it out on the road to hopefully seat what is left of the rings and hope that the smoking stops or at least dramatically decreases. Can someone give me some more insight as to what damage I have possibly done, or any other advice you can think of for an initial break-in? Thank you for taking the time to read this! Happy NEW YEAR! I'm trying to start mine up on a better note with getting this car on the road for the first time in 6 years.
 

f00g00

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For my 1JZ I used 30 weight Dino oil not synthetic for 50 miles then changed it. The next change was at 500.
I seated the rings by immediately after starting getting on the street and staying in first gear easing up to about 3000 rpm and engine braking down to below 1000 about 10 times. Varying the engine load is crucial in helping them to seat. Idling is not good.
I didn't boost or go over 3000 rpm for the first 500 miles.
 
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the t3d

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For my 1JZ I used 30 weight Dino oil not synthetic for 50 miles then changed it. The next change was at 500.
I seated the rings by immediately after starting getting on the street and staying in first gear easing up to about 3000 rpm and engine braking down to below 1000 about 10 times. Varying the engine load is crucial in helping them to seat. Idling is not good.
I didn't boost or go over 3000 rpm for the first 500 miles.
Yeah that sounds like you did exactly what you were supposed to. I'm gonna find out today if I can salvage the break-in process.
 

suprarx7nut

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When you say "lean", what exact ratio are we talking? And how are you measuring it (gauge, sensor and location)?

I think you'll be fine if you get it under some load as soon as you start it back up and vary as ^^ said.
 

the t3d

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When you say "lean", what exact ratio are we talking? And how are you measuring it (gauge, sensor and location)?

I think you'll be fine if you get it under some load as soon as you start it back up and vary as ^^ said.
Hello. I have AEM wideband kit with sensor, so I am using the gauge readings inside the car. The sensor is about a third of the way down the downpipe. The gauge has served me well for accurate AFR in the past. The numbers were full lean, as in no numbers, just the dashes in the LEAN spectrum. I would've preferred to get a number reading, but I'm hoping by adding some fuel, I can get a reading. I was going to put the key on and see where the current SAFC2 fuel additions are at, since I haven't changed them since it was actually running with a little bit different setup like 6 years ago.
 

suprarx7nut

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Hello. I have AEM wideband kit with sensor, so I am using the gauge readings inside the car. The sensor is about a third of the way down the downpipe. The gauge has served me well for accurate AFR in the past. The numbers were full lean, as in no numbers, just the dashes in the LEAN spectrum. I would've preferred to get a number reading, but I'm hoping by adding some fuel, I can get a reading. I was going to put the key on and see where the current SAFC2 fuel additions are at, since I haven't changed them since it was actually running with a little bit different setup like 6 years ago.
Ok, gotcha, thanks. I'm interested in what happens if you remove all correction from the SAFC. Just let the OEM ECU do its thing. It should be very close without any trim - certainly close enough to allow you to safely break in the rings. If it's still pegged lean then something's gone wrong somewhere. I guess the best option at that point might be to screw with the SAFC to get near stoich ASAP and break the rings in. After that you can take your time troubleshooting.
 

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Also agree with what the others have stated.

You should still have time to properly bed in the rings to the crosshatched cylinder walls.

KEY ITEMS:
-Switch to a very basic break in oil. Straight 30W conventional, could also use 30W non-detergent oil that would speed up the process slightly.
-Get your A/F ratios close to normal, they don't need to be perfect but I would say don't go heavily rich or lean.
You don't want to wash the cylinder walls down with lots of excess fuel or lean causing lots of excess heat.

Just vary the load all the time while driving as f00g00 stated.
Medium / heavy acceleration AND deceleration on the engine, need to pull a heavy vacuum.
Best to stay out of boost.

Check the compression on the engine periodically as you put miles on the engine to see if its in spec or rises.
 

Piratetip

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#8
Question for you:

I was looking at how you are routing the BOV hose recirculation.
Do you have any more photos of that plastic connector directly above the intake accordion?

To me it looks like you are routing the BOV vent directly to the idle control valve?
Or is there a T fitting that is connecting both the BOV vent and the idle control hose together directly to the intake accordion?

Either way I would re- configure those connections.
-Connect the idle control hose directly to the accordion and run the BOV to its own fitting on the intake in front of the turbo.

More photos of this area should help, as I can't get a good look of whats going on there.
 

the t3d

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Ok, gotcha, thanks. I'm interested in what happens if you remove all correction from the SAFC. Just let the OEM ECU do its thing. It should be very close without any trim - certainly close enough to allow you to safely break in the rings. If it's still pegged lean then something's gone wrong somewhere. I guess the best option at that point might be to screw with the SAFC to get near stoich ASAP and break the rings in. After that you can take your time troubleshooting.
I should be able to manipulate and zero out the Safc2 with just the key on and not let the engine run in the process. I am curious of that as well. Then I can fiddle from there. I. Will just have to work quickly.
 

the t3d

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Question for you:

I was looking at how you are routing the BOV hose recirculation.
Do you have any more photos of that plastic connector directly above the intake accordion?

To me it looks like you are routing the BOV vent directly to the idle control valve?
Or is there a T fitting that is connecting both the BOV vent and the idle control hose together directly to the intake accordion?

Either way I would re- configure those connections.
-Connect the idle control hose directly to the accordion and run the BOV to its own fitting on the intake in front of the turbo.

More photos of this area should help, as I can't get a good look of whats going on there.
I am running the straight 30w oil and she's already seen one oil change so far. She'll get another one after this break-in run. As far as the BOV and ISC, are joined by a t-fitting to the intake pipe. That pipe only has 2 large hose fittings. Can I use the vacuum source that I have on the TB that points to the passenger side, as the vacuum source for the oil catch can? If so, I can let the BOV and the ISC have their own connections. I can conceptually see how that may make things funky if there are any issues with either part.


So like I mentioned to YotaMD, my plan is to zero out the SAFC2 with just the key on so I am not running the motor. While it is warming up I will have to quickly make adjustments to get some safe numbers to road test with, and then I can take her out. She will probably be smoking at this point, and I will just have to hope that it will diminish after I'm done. Do you think I should route those hoses differently before I put her on the road? Should I just accel/deccel in cycles throughout 1st and 4th gear, while staying under 4000rpms and minimal to no boost?
 

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Ah I see now.
Yeah honestly I would run the BOV straight down into the intake on its own fitting.

Routing the connections that way through that T fitting could be problematic IMO.
Since the flow out of the BOV is going to prefer going straight through, possibly pressurizing the side of the IAC that should not see pressure.
Could damage the IAC or diaphram in it, may also cause some drivability / engine running issues.
Might also restrict the amount of air bypass the BOV is able to move, could cause Turbo surging when off the throttle.
The 90° turn for that type of flow isn't going to work well IMO.

Can you weld in a 3rd fitting?
Or in the interim until a more permanent solution can be implemented you could turn the 90° fitting so the BOV path is straight and the IAC has the perpendicular side.

I would not join the PCV and IAC hoses together through that T fitting.
The engine might pull the PCV fumes through the IAC, which is not ideal.
IAC should really only pull in clean air post air filter.
 

the t3d

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Ah I see now.
Yeah honestly I would run the BOV straight down into the intake on its own fitting.

Routing the connections that way through that T fitting could be problematic IMO.
Since the flow out of the BOV is going to prefer going straight through, possibly pressurizing the side of the IAC that should not see pressure.
Could damage the IAC or diaphram in it, may also cause some drivability / engine running issues.
Might also restrict the amount of air bypass the BOV is able to move, could cause Turbo surging when off the throttle.
The 90° turn for that type of flow isn't going to work well IMO.

Can you weld in a 3rd fitting?
Or in the interim until a more permanent solution can be implemented you could turn the 90° fitting so the BOV path is straight and the IAC has the perpendicular side.

I would not join the PCV and IAC hoses together through that T fitting.
The engine might pull the PCV fumes through the IAC, which is not ideal.
IAC should really only pull in clean air post air filter.
Okay, so I took what you said to heart. It all makes a lot of sense, so I called it tonight and didn't run it. I did, however, start re-routing the hoses. I believe I had the same setup on the first build, but I can clearly see the implications of unloading all that boost pressure back onto the diaphragm over and over. I found some extra 90-degree hose connectors and started to give each part its own intake pipe nipple. I gotta run to West Marine tomorrow morning to get some more and pickup a hose reducer to link the vacuum source of the oil catch can to the throttle body that is shown in the picture.




Since I re-wired the starting system, I am having starting the car consistently by turning the key. The signal wire is just not getting enough voltage, so the starter just clicks and doesn't turn. The good thing is I have a Power Probe III and I tapped into the signal wire just before the connector, and when I apply power directly from the battery to the starter with the PPIII and the key in the ON position. I can deal with that issue at a later time, but just something that is annoying, especially if I stall, which is why I was like it is better to re-route these hoses now, rather than cause any other issues that can lead to a stall. I definitely feel much better about the initial test drive thanks to everyone chiming in, so I appreciate your help very much.

I also zero-ed out the the SAFC2 in both the HI and LOW throttle settings. In the lower RPMS, it was pretty much all at zero from me minimizing the fuel adjustments way back when, but there was noticeable fuel subtraction on the higher end, which I believe was from when they tuned it on the dyno for WOT. I documented it and then erased it all, so I can start fresh. I am really hoping after everything that has been done now, I am able to just take it out of the driveway and seat these damn rings in without leaning out or stalling. You think I should just make these passes for like 10-15 minutes or so, with all the fluctuations? Thanks again man. Super grateful!
 

the t3d

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http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

This is like a few have stated already. It's how I broke my engine in and I don't have any smoke issues or any other issues for that matter.
Haha yeah I have this link bookmarked and have read this sucker thoroughly, which is what lead to me some what freaking out about letting idle in the driveway for too long back in August. Tomorrow should be an interesting day. I'll keep everyone posted.
 

the t3d

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I am happy to update those that were kind enough to offer peace of mind and advice. I finished rearranging the ISC and BOV hoses. I did my final inspections and fired up the car. I did find out that my aftermarket relay I used in the fuel system rewire some years ago was sticking a little bit. I started adding a little fuel across the RPM range in low throttle and started reading numbers on the AFR gauge. As soon as I saw that, I made sure the car was warmed up and set off to drive the car for the first time in 6 years. I got on it a bit, made sure to stay out of boost and not lean out. I kept her under 4k rpms. I drove around for like 20 minutes in my open neighborhood running through strong pulls in first, second, and third gear. She started to respond more and more the throttle as I drove her. Didn't stall out once and not one misfire. She definitely needs more proper tuning, but the smoke died down significantly and will probably continue to reduce after I continue the break-in runs. This motor runs very smooth and quiet at idle. No check engine light. Perfect oil pressure and a solid 21 inches of vacuum at idle. It's beautiful. I did find a decent oil leak to the main oil feed line to the turbo, but its at the top and very fixable. I ran out of time to break her in more, but the heavy load and initial seating is pretty much done now. I'll be back during spring break to get on her a little more and run through the gears in more open roads when I have more time and fix the little issues here and there. I am so happy and proud of the work I've done to see this thing come alive after so many years. I stayed away from boost and she was moving, so I know this is really going to be fun when she is all tuned up. Thank you again everyone for your help. I'll a short video of me driving after I upload it.
 
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Nice!
Sounds like you are making some good progress!
 

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#21
Hello,
congrats on your progress.
I'm curious about two things; first being your oil catch can for the crankcase ventilation, you have a small filter on that so I guess it's venting to atmosphere, is this correct? If yes, then you are pulling in air through that which is not measured.

The second thing is the stock PCV connection on the throttle body, I cant see it being connected to anything or being blocked, so here you have another possible source of unmetered air.

These leaks will depend on which loadpoint you're at. But perhaps I've missed something?
 

the t3d

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Hello,
congrats on your progress.
I'm curious about two things; first being your oil catch can for the crankcase ventilation, you have a small filter on that so I guess it's venting to atmosphere, is this correct? If yes, then you are pulling in air through that which is not measured.

The second thing is the stock PCV connection on the throttle body, I cant see it being connected to anything or being blocked, so here you have another possible source of unmetered air.

These leaks will depend on which loadpoint you're at. But perhaps I've missed something?
Thanks man. You brought up a good point about the filter on the catch can. I may cap it and see if I notice any changes. The pcv outlet on the throttle body on the firewall side is actually the vacuum source for the catch can. I linked up a couple of different sized hoses just to get it done and driveable. I can just use one longer 3/8" oil based hose from the catch can to the TB. That's what you you were referring to, no?
 

eraezer

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Ok, I didn't see the hose routing from the throttle body.
what hose sizes do you have in that setup?
If you cap the air filter connection on the catch-can I think you will benefit in two ways, your fuel calculations will be based on the actual amount of air that is entering your engine, and you will also hopefully get better crankcase vacuum.
 

the t3d

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Ok, I didn't see the hose routing from the throttle body.
what hose sizes do you have in that setup?
If you cap the air filter connection on the catch-can I think you will benefit in two ways, your fuel calculations will be based on the actual amount of air that is entering your engine, and you will also hopefully get better crankcase vacuum.
I appreciate you spotting that, cause I think you're right. That's a big leak if unmetered air. I don't get to play with her until Spring break rolls around because I'm at school, but I'll be adding that to the list of things to work on while I'm there. As far as the hose size, i believe it's 1/2, I thought I needed a reducer but then realized I didn't, so I'll just be replacing the whole hose with one single hose. Should I run it some more to continue seating the rings or check compression and retorque the head first? I gotta remove a lot to get the head studs, and I boost leak tested the piping so no leaks as it sits, but I know as soon as remove it, it's gonna cause a leak somewhere lol.