CPS Connectors/Wiring

IchibanEye

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#1
Hello all. I have a couple of questions as I cannot get a hold of Arron and when I did (after 2 days, still has not replied to my e-mail) it was way rushed (he is traveling?) over the phone, him not me. I asked Arron about the Male and female replacement connectors, that are shown on Driftmotion site for my 7MGTE. I asked if I would need anything else for them, from DM to complete the needed replacement/upgrade. He said no, just order the connections. Oh, he was not correct, not listening to me and could have saved me time. The female Side of the CPS connector needs it all, as it's just the connection housing with no wires or bits. So as pictured below, please notice what I have underlined on the female connection information page itself. It uses 090-II pins w/large wire seals. NOTED!
cps female conn.JPG
Now I understand what it says specifically, but here is where it gets confusing for me because of the discrepancies in information provided in Driftmotions site. Please pay attention to the underlined item in each example and each corresponding description for the individual items. In the next two examples of the different repair wire sets. One of these particular types is needed to complete the wiring of the female CPS connector.

Enter in the 090-II terminal wire example. You think bingo, I got it (because it matches the female connector description) but, just wait for the description of this particular item to through you off track. As pictured below. It states however the wrong engines for my application not only that, but the wrong year category for my car and motor. I am rocking a 1988 7MGTE. Seeing the discrepancy here.
090-II terminal wire.JPG
Lastly I have the last bit of confusion to add to the mix. Pictured below is the other option I went to to try and clear this up and get the correct needed parts so I can get my baby running smoothly again. Again pay attention to this items description please. It just states that it fits "many" connectors (not all) on the 7m motor, and covers my year make. That is all fine and dandy, IF it matched up of what IS required per the CPS female description states. Which is to use the other type 090-II terminal.
090 Terminal wire.JPG So what do any of you wire gurus know about this here? I want to do what is required by Toyota as best as I can and keep things of this nature as factory as possible. Wait and try Arron on Monday? As I will not complete the rest of my big order until I know what all is needed at one big swoop. Has someone here done the female CPS connector side restore and rebuilt properly? If you have, please let me know what to do here, as my eyes can no longer look at my TSRM small print nor stare at the screen for to much longer.

ps. Has anyone also replaced their OG accordion intake pipe with the thicker, more flexible DM one, and if so did you notice any different intake temps if measured and a better noticeable airflow as stated by DM? Thanks to anyone in advance if you can help me get this sorted out before Monday. That way I can already have my order placed, ready and waiting for DM come Monday.
 
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3p141592654

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#2
A couple of points I would make.

Sometimes only the connector housing has gone bad. They get brittle and break because of the high heat neat the exhaust. So you can "de-pin" the CPS wires from the old connector housing and reuse them for the new housing. If you can do that then you don't need to buy new terminal pins.

If the actual wires are bad and broken, then you need to replace the terminals. What DM is selling are the terminal pins crimped to a small piece of wire. The wire will need to be spliced into the harness. That means you need to cut off the existing connectors and use butt splice to connect the short pigtail wires to the harness. If you use butt crimps you will need to buy the crimps and the crimp tool. If you are going to solder then you will need the soldering tools, heatshrink and all that.

Personally, I would never use the terminal with pigtails. It just results in a huge mess of butt crimps. If the terminal pins are bad, then invest in a crimp tool for them and just put new pins on the existing wires. If the wires are too shot to fix, then I would get a rebuilt CPS with new wires.
 
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Piratetip

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#3
It's really not that difficult.

http://www.cycleterminal.com/mt-series-090.html
Buy the MT .090 Sumitomo kit at the bottom of the page or each individual connector you need.
Get the good crimping too also.

Clip off the terminals ( if they are bad) otherwise just de-pin and put a new housing on.
If you are crimping new terminals on, the weather pack seals you need are there as well.

I bought the kit and performed the exact repair on my 87 you are asking about. My CPS connector has never been better. :)

Then you can continue replacing every other connector housing you can find underhood!

I agree with pi, never use pigtails.
Usually there is enough wire slack to clip off the old pins and crimp new on.
Unless the wire is brittle and cracking insulation off.
 
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IchibanEye

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#5
A couple of points I would make.

Sometimes only the connector housing has gone bad. They get brittle and break because of the high heat neat the exhaust. So you can "de-pin" the CPS wires from the old connector housing and reuse them for the new housing. If you can do that then you don't need to buy new terminal pins.

If the actual wires are bad and broken, then you need to replace the terminals. What DM is selling are the terminal pins crimped to a small piece of wire. The wire will need to be spliced into the harness. That means you need to cut off the existing connectors and use butt splice to connect the short pigtail wires to the harness. If you use butt crimps you will need to buy the crimps and the crimp tool. If you are going to solder then you will need the soldering tools, heatshrink and all that.

Personally, I would never use the terminal with pigtails. It just results in a huge mess of butt crimps. If the terminal pins are bad, then invest in a crimp tool for them and just put new pins on the existing wires. If the wires are too shot to fix, then I would get a rebuilt CPS with new wires.
Thank you for replying but you did not even address the reason for my post.

I am aware of what happens with the connections. If I am already in the area working and replacing things. I am going to add the new connections to the Connectors in too. It is something most people do, especially mechanics (good ones) take these steps as to insure a part staying in good order longer. When it comes to cars only replacing one part usually ends up with the other side, end or thing taking a shit on you not long after having done the work.

I will not be crimping anything, the wires will be soldered together. Splicing/crimping is the easy way around things and also not the best thing to do. You make soldering sound like a chore when it is far easier than messing with crimping and de-pining, re-pinning and all. Anything under the hood that includes wiring should always be protected with a good rated heat shrink when ever possible.
 

IchibanEye

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#6
It's really not that difficult. I bought the kit and performed the exact repair on my 87 you are asking about. My CPS connector has never been better. :)

Then you can continue replacing every other connector housing you can find underhood!
What is not difficult? I never said the job was difficult. I asked about the discrepancies on the Driftmotion site.

So you mentioned ''the kit'' was it purchased from DM? I ask because that is the reason for me creating this thread and why I asked about it specifically. If it was, then this leads to my second original question. If you got the female side based on what you said previously, you most likely just de-pinned and used the existing wires. If you did not and used new wires for the female side what ones did you get from DM the 090 or 090-II? The other question I presented in my first post.

I do appreciate the links to other places for electrical needs. I will bookmark them for the future, as it is never a bad thing to have too many resources to pull from if need be.

At this point I am just going to wait until Monday and get a direct answer from Aaron on the needed parts for the female connector he has listed.
 

Piratetip

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#7
If you want to understand in detail the MT 090 connectors don't rely on driftmotion to tell you.

Get the information from the source. Sumitomo.
Datasheet
http://prd.sws.co.jp/components/series/pdf/en/mts.pdf
Everything you need to know is there.
https://www.ttiinc.com/content/ttii...html?mfrShortname=SUM&partsNumber=6180-4771-B

I can't comment on what driftmotion has, don't believe I have ever bought from them.
Their information I find very lacking in detail, there are much better places to source parts from imo.
 

3p141592654

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#8
The 090 pins are used on pre89 cars. The 090-II are for post 89 connectors and have a locking tab. However, if you are buying the housing and the pins together, then they need to match. That is why you are much better off buying from a place that specializes in these connectors, not DM.

Don't buy the pigtail connectors from DM if you are so concerned about bringing things back to OEM spec because the pigtail wire gauge won't match most of the time. There are female and male pins for the connectors. Obviously you need to buy both if replacing both halves of the connector. Also, the pins are wire size specific. You need to match the pin to the wire size you are connecting to, and Toyota uses many different wire sizes depending on the current rating of the circuit.

You will find that crimps are required for high-rel applications such as avation. This is not because soldering is unreliable, but because it is impossible to certify a solder joint as it is dependent on the skill of the technician. However, crimps made with an approved tool will turn out reliable gas-tight joints every time and are not dependent on technician skill.

1553402951354.png
 

IchibanEye

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#9
The 090 pins are used on pre89 cars. The 090-II are for post 89 connectors and have a locking tab. However, if you are buying the housing and the pins together, then they need to match. That is why you are much better off buying from a place that specializes in these connectors, not DM.

Don't buy the pigtail connectors from DM if you are so concerned about bringing things back to OEM spec because the pigtail wire gauge won't match most of the time. There are female and male pins for the connectors. Obviously you need to buy both if replacing both halves of the connector. Also, the pins are wire size specific. You need to match the pin to the wire size you are connecting to, and Toyota uses many different wire sizes depending on the current rating of the circuit.

You will find that crimps are required for high-rel applications such as avation. This is not because soldering is unreliable, but because it is impossible to certify a solder joint as it is dependent on the skill of the technician. However, crimps made with an approved tool will turn out reliable gas-tight joints every time and are not dependent on technician skill.

View attachment 81781
Look at you finally addressing my original question!!! Thank you, for real.

If you assumed I meant soldier the connections or crimped ends required for connector placement, that is funny. I am talking wire to wire in soldiering land.

I also understand different connections and different wires and gauges are based on load and what not. I DO NOT need to buy both as you stated. I only need to buy what is required of each connection/connector. Again thank you otherwise.
 

IchibanEye

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#10
If you want to understand in detail the MT 090 connectors don't rely on driftmotion to tell you.

Get the information from the source. Sumitomo.
Datasheet
http://prd.sws.co.jp/components/series/pdf/en/mts.pdf
Everything you need to know is there.
https://www.ttiinc.com/content/ttii...html?mfrShortname=SUM&partsNumber=6180-4771-B

I can't comment on what driftmotion has, don't believe I have ever bought from them.
Their information I find very lacking in detail, there are much better places to source parts from imo.
I did provide the detail from Driftmotion. So, at least to the respect of my post I did. I will now take a look at your sources that you provided.

Also would Toyota not be the source of sources? I have looked over the TSRM and the TSRM wiring book, and it even did not get detailed enough.

Much props to you and thanks again.
 

3p141592654

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#11
If you assumed I meant soldier the connections or crimped ends required for connector placement, that is funny. I am talking wire to wire in soldiering land.
No, I did not mean that. I am referring to the wire to wire connection. Assuming you know how to select a no-clean flux, that you can ensure the solder joint is not cold, and that you can address the need for wire strain relief at each end of the joint, then you will have a successful solder joint. Or you can use a good quality barrel crimp and again after addressing strain relief then you will have an equally successful crimp splice.
 
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figgie

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#12
ahh the million year old debate of soldering vs crimping but in fact it is not a debate.

Soldering introduces rigid points that will eventually snap off.

In jet land, anything on engines or if that area has any type of motion or vibration is ALWAYS crimped and never soldered. Hell very very few places were soldered (pins on certain circular connectors were soldered but the majority were always crimped).

the big question to answer is, is there any movement/vibration in that area. If the answer is yes, do not solder unless you want to redo it again.
 

3p141592654

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#13
There is no debate. Solder done right is as reliable as crimps. Was used on the Apollo space missions (vibration anyone?) and AT&T used it for years in their networks. NASA had a solder technician certification program for vendors and their procedures are well publicized. What is true is that solder is way more expensive to do right than crimping. Hence industry has gone all crimp except of course for printed wiring boards where solder is king. Strain relief management is the same for both systems, a metal crimp terminal is just as rigid as a solder joint. Manage the transition and you will be fine (NASA did it, you can too).
Screenshot_2019-04-03 tn-d7438_apollo_reliability_quality_assurance pdf(1).png Screenshot_2019-04-04 Pinterest.png AT&T lineman soldering circa 1945.
 
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figgie

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#14
There is no debate. Solder done right is as reliable as crimps. Was used on the Apollo space missions (vibration anyone?) and AT&T used it for years in their networks. NASA had a solder technician certification program for vendors and their procedures are well publicized. What is true is that solder is way more expensive to do right than crimping. Hence industry has gone all crimp except of course for printed wiring boards where solder is king. Strain relief management is the same for both systems, a metal crimp terminal is just as rigid as a solder joint. Manage the transition and you will be fine (NASA did it, you can too).
View attachment 81807 View attachment 81808 AT&T lineman soldering circa 1945.

3p, I would not use previous era information as what was true then is not true now true now after all back then

Smoking was allowed inside of office spaces
Tolerances for parts are no where what we can achieve now.

I was certified to do aerospace soldering in the military.

It is not cost as much as a time thing.

The big difference is training on the soldering. IE, right temp, right flux and right solder for the wire being used. Four moving variables that can easily be messed up under an untrained person and still gets messed up under a trained person.

Add to that the higher heat capacity of the aerospace grade wire like the nickel plated wire and now you have to id each wire. Even NASA did not have that amount of time (try to id 88 wires in a bundle packed into a circular connector).

Crimp on the other hand fairly straight forward, id gauge of wire, id necessary pin (thank you ring identifiers which automatically tell you what turret to use to crimp) and go to town but that is what happens when the aerospace and space industry standardizes on specific wires, connectors etc.
 

3p141592654

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#15
That is correct. Soldering is much more expensive (time=money), and is very dependent on training. That's why certification bodies specify crimps. Much easier to tell Bubba he needs to buy an approved crimper and crimps, easier to inspect, and easier to know it is done right. All of that, however, does not mean solder is bad, or cannot be used in high vibration or corrosive environments.... and solder can be more compact, which is the real reason I prefer it for some applications.
 

IchibanEye

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#16
I got it figured out. Arron admitted the verbiage needs to be updated so it is less confusing and does not contradict itself. All in all I got what I needed.